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NORWOOD iJ3R ' W 

Nic'n 



GUIDANCE OFFICE 
Senior High Scl 
Norwood, Mass. 

riORWOODHIC '.LIBRARY 

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RESMTED BY THE CLAS& Of 1941-. NORWOOD SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



NORWOOD HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY 
Nichols S- i 



194 1 Tl OT 



THIS BOOK IS DEDICATED 

TO OUR MOTHERS 

AND FATHERS 



194 1 




EDITORIAL STAFF 

Co-Editors-in-Chief 



MARION E. BAILEY 



MARY T. NUTTALL 

Advertising Manager 
LOUISE GUSTAFSON 



Co-Art-Editors 



MARJORIE H. BODGE 



MARY J. GUILLEMETTE 

Circulation Manager 
DOROTHY CARPENTER 



Chairman Picture Committee 
DONALD CODY 



194 1 TIOT 



EDITORIAL 

As youths all over the country graduate from their respective high schools this 
year, they face a world which is more troubled and uncertain than at any other 
time in history. In order to face this world with any degree of confidence each 
graduate must possess higher resources of moral strength, mental aptitude, and 
physical fitness than ever before was required. 

We who are graduating from Norwood High School have received as fine an 
education as could be obtained in any high school anywhere. However, we hope 
that as we leave the school we will take with us much more than the fundamental 
technicalities of our learning. We desire to carry with us the ideals which have 
been presented to us behind the facts which we have learned; ideals of democracy, 
patriotism, service and unselfishness. We want to remember the things we have 
learned about human relationships; making and keeping friends, and working with 
people in a spirit of willing cooperation. We wish to do more and greater things 
with the opportunities for individuality and originality which have been ours 
during these last three years. Lastly, we hope to carry with us into the outside 
world the ability to apply whatever knowledge we have acquired in school to the 
practical, everyday problems of life. 

All these things have been given to each of us during our years in high school, 
but each of us will cherish and use them in a different way. However, the degree 
to which each of us has absorbed these standards and ideals of real worth will 
determine the true value of our individual diplomas. 

Let us hope that those of us who have never consciously thought about all 
that high school does for a person, especially a modern, well governed school such 
as ours, will come to appreciate it and to show our appreciation by being a credit 
to it. The knowledge, the ideals, and the understanding of human nature which 
we gain in high school are the best implements with which we can face the troubled 
world. 

Marion Bailey, 
Marjorie Bodge, 
Editor s-in- Ch ief 




MR. LEIGHTON THOMPSON 

Principal 





MISS RUTH GOW 
Dean of Girls 
Head of Mathematics Department 



MR. CHARLES HAYDEN 
Submaster 



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Miss Mary E. Coughlin Marjorie McCready Miss Irene L. Doyle Mr. John B. Kelley Miss Margaret Kenefick 
Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial 




Miss Grace McGonagle Prof. John V. Dethier Mr. Clifford Wheeler 
School Treasurer Supervisor oj Music Supervisor of Practical Arts 

Head of Comm. Dept. 




Miss Marguerite Elliot Mr. James H. Butler, Jr. Mr. D. Vincent Kenefick 
Head of History Dept. History History 




Miss Elizabeth D. James Miss Louise McCormack Miss Eleanor Peaeody Miss Elizabeth O'Sullivan Miss Mary Hubbard 
Head of English Dept. English English English English 



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J i* *. ' 






FM 



'Mr. Everett Learnard Mr. Stanley C. Fisher Mr. John Si i.i.ivan Mr. Henry Fairbanks Mr. James A, Di ■■-. 
Head of Science Dept. Science Science Mathematics Mathematics 




Mr. H. Bennett Murray Mr. James J. Gormley 
Supervisor of Physical Faculty Mgr. of Athletics 
Education, Coach Economics 




Miss Ruth Johncren Miss Mildred Metcalf Mrs. Ethel H. Cook 
Head of Language Dept. Languages Art 




Mr. Robert E. O'Neil Miss M. Elaine Fulton Miss Alice Howard Miss Mary Canning 
Practical Arts Home Economics Secretary School Nurse 



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CLASS ADVISERS 




Miss Louise McCormack 
Chairman 






Miss Eleanor Peabody Mr. Henry Fairbanks Miss Elizabeth D. James 





Mr. D. Vincent Kenefick Miss Elizabeth O'Sullivan 



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CLASS OFFICERS 



FRANCIS SURETTE 
Boys' Treasurer 



HELEN ZUKE 

Girls' Treasurer 



DONALD CODY LOUISE GUSTAFSON EDWARD DONOVAN 

President Vice-President A. A. Council 

BARBARA HOOD 

Secretary 



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POSED?— 4TH YEAR LATIN 




TAKE A LETTER MISS HOWARD— OFFICE 



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SOPHIE G. AIDUKONIS 28 Savin Ave. 

"When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again." 
Home Room Representative (1, 2), Quest Club, Traffic 
Squad. 



AUSTIN JAMES BAILEY, JR. 738 Wash. St. 

"See Your Ford Dealer." 
Quest Club, Sophomore Plav, Photography Club 
(Secretary), Rifle Club (President 3), Traffic Squad, 
Graduation Usher '40. 



PIUS JOSEPH AMIRAULT 109 Vernon St. 

'Whistle While You Work." 
Junior Party Committee, Quest Club, Football (2, 3), 
Traffic Squad, Class Will Committee. 

MARION ELIZABETH BAILEY 19 Nichols St. 

"Dark Eyes." 
Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Party Committees, 
Junior Prom Committee, Class Day Committee, 
Orchestra (1, 2, 3), Band (1, 2, 3), Quest Club, Traffic 
Squad (Lieutenant), Class Historian, Co-Editor 
Year Book, Knights of Columbus and Chamber of 
Commerce Prize Essay Winner. 



HAROLD R. ANDERSON 31 West St. 

"You Cant Read a Book by Its Cover." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Sophomore 
Play, Junior Prom Committee, Quest Club (3), Senior 
Play, Track, Year Book Dance Committee. 



DOROTHY C. BALBONI 



10 Tremont St. 



"Funiculi Funicula." 
Quest Club, Advertising Staff Year Book. 



21 Tr. 



it St. 



ANGELO DANNY ANTONELLI 

"Oh Danny-Boy!" 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Quest Club 
(Representative 1, 2, President 3), Traffic Squad, Football 
(Co-Captain 3), Basketball (Captain 3), Baseball (1, 2), 
Letter Club. 



EVELYN MARY BALDUF 



57 Wilson St. 



"It's a Wonderful World." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Quest Club. 



WILLIAM BADER 34 Sturtevant Ave. 

"Practice Makes Perfect." 
Quest Club, Traffic Squad, Baseball" (1, 2, 3), Basketball 
(1,2, 3), Football (1,2,3). 

MARION VICTORIA BAMBER 18 Gardner Rd. 

"You Meet the Nicest People." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committee, Sophomore 
Play, Senior Play Committee, Year Book Dance Com- 
mittee, Quest Club. 



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FRANCIS BAR|()D 15 Weld Ave. 

"I'm Rushin' to My Crush in My Old Jalop." 
Senior Party Committee. 

FLORENCE MARIE BILOTTA 21 Shaw St. 

"If You Should Go to Venice." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Senior 
Play, Year Book Dance Committee, Quest Club. 



MURIEL CATHERINE BARRETT 40 Prospect Ave. 

"Doin the Jive." 
Quest Club. 

MARJORIK HOLBROOK BODGE 127 Vernon St. 

"The Lady in Red." 
Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Party Committees, 
Sophomore Play, Junior Prom Committee, Class Day 
Committee, Year Book Dance Committee, Senior 
Play, Quest Club, Traffic Squad, Dramatic Club, 
Co-editor Year Book, Representative to Boston 
Chapter Junior Red Cross (Won trip to Washington). 



BEATRICE FELICIA BARTUL1S 33 Sturtevant Ave. 

"I'll Sing Your Praises." 
Quest Club, Class Day Committee, Senior Play Usher, 
Year Book Dance Committee, Traffic Squad, Year Book 
Quotations. 

EDWARD DAVID BOWLES 1329 Wash. St. 

"Shave and a Haircut — Two Bits." 
Quest Club, Basketball (1), Baseball (1, 2, 3). 



RUTH ANN BEREZIN 42 Chapel St. 

"You Could Make Such Beautiful Music." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Sophomore 
Play, Year Book Dance Committee, Senior Play Com- 
mittee, Orchestra (1, 2, 3), Traffic Squad, Quest Club, 
Photography Club (3). 

ALICE AGNES BREEN 417 Nahatan St. 

"Sweet Someone." 
Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Party Committees, 
Junior Prom Committee, Class Day Committee, 
Quest Club, Dramatic Club, Tennis. 



MARY G. BERNIER 382 Walpole St. 

"Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, the Boys Are Marshing." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Class Day- 
Committee, Traffic Squad, Quest Club, Year Book Picture 
Committee. 

ALFRED LEO BREEN 417 Nahatan St. 

"Stop Pretending." 
Quest Club, Home Room Representative (3), Traffic 
Squad (Lieutenant), Year Book Dance Committee, 
Football (1, 2, 3), Basketball (1, 2). 




15 



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ROBERT RICHARD BRISSETTE 481 Nahatan St. 

"K-K-K-Kaly." 
Quest Club, Class Day Committee, Track (1), Golf (2), 
Tennis (1, 2). 

DOROTHY FREDA CARPENTER 165 Vernon.St. 

"When We Build Our Little Home." 
Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Party Committees, 
Sophomore Play, Junior Prom Committee, Class Day 
Committee, Senior Play Committee, Quest Club, 
Traffic Squad, Circulation Manager Year Book. 



WILLIAM FRANCIS BUTTERS 19 Weld Ave. 

"Red Sails in the Sunset." 
Class President (1, 2), Sophomore, Junior Party Com- 
mittees, Junior Prom Committee, Quest Club, Football 

(2, 3). 

RALPH DAVID CASHEN 17 West St. 

"Something's Gotta Happen Soon." 
Quest Club (2, 3), Senior Play Committee. 



EMILY ELIZABETH CAPPUCCINO 

"!• Have Room in My Heart.' 
Quest Club. 



34 Sixth St. 



MARY ELIZABETH CENTER 266 Lenox St. 

"Remember (the) Maine." 
Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Party Committees, 
Sophomore Play Committee, Class Day Committee, 
Year Book Dance Committee, Head Usher Senior 
Play, Traffic Squad, Advertising Staff Year Book, 
Photography Club (2, 3). 



BARBARA LOUISE CARCHEDI 13 Dean St. 

"Let's Dream in the Moonlight." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Quest Club. 

JOHN MURRAY CLAPP, JR. 141 Walpole St. 

"What Are You Thinking of, Baby?" 
Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Party Committees, 
Sophomore Play Committee, Junior Prom Com- 
mittee, Class Day Usher, Graduation Usher, Year 
Book Dance Committee, Senior Play Committee, 
Quest Club, Dramatic Club, Tennis (3), Golf (1), 
Senior Prom Committee, Advertising Staff Year Book. 



JOSEPH L. CARCHEDI _ 22 Lenox Ave. 

"What 'Cha Know Joe." 
Quest Club, Traffic Squad, Baseball, Basketball. 

DONALD JAMES CODY 47 Sycamore St. 

"Don Quixote." 
Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Party Committees, 
Sophomore Play Committee, Junior Prom Com- 
mittee, Class Day Committee, Year Book Dance 
Committee, Senior Play Committee, Quest Club, 
Dramatic Club, Letter Club, Traffic Squad, Football 
(1, 2, 3), Baseball (2, 3), Track (1, 2, 3, Captain), 
Photography Editor Year Book, Golf (1), Class 
President (3). 



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JOHN VINCENT COLLINS, JR. 65 Winslow Ave. 
"What's the Story, Morning Glory?" 

Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Parry Committees, Sopho- 
more Play Committee, Junior Prom Committee, Senior 
Play Committee, Year Book Dance Committee, Quest 
Club, Dramatic Club, Golf (I), Tennis (3), Advertising 
Staff Year Hook. 

JAMKS MICHAEL COSTELLO 109 Casey St. 

"The Good Humor Man." 

Sophomore, Junior, anil Senior Party Committees, 
Sophomore Play Committee, Junior Prom Com- 
mittee, Class Dav Committee, Home Room Repre- 
sentative (3), Quest Club, Football (1,2, 3), Baseball 
(1,2, 3), Tennis (3), Track (3), Letter Club, Traffic 
Squad, Year Book Quotation Committee. 

MARY MARGARET CONNOLLY _ 14 Myrtle St. 

"Can This Be Love?" 
Sophomore, Junior, ami Senior Party Committees, Junior 
Prom Committee, Year Book Dance Committee, Senior 
Play Committee, Quest Club, Dramatic Club, Tennis (1,2). 

EDMUND JOSEPH COUGHLIN 66 Cross St. 

"Every Little Breeze Seems to Whisper ' Louise'." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Junior Prom 
Committee, Year Book Dance Committee, Traffic 
Squad, Quest Club (Representative 1, 3, Treasurer 2) 
Home Room Representative (1), Orchestra (1, 2), 
Band (1,2,3). 



EVELYN MARY CONROY 

"My Wild Irish Rose.' 
Junior Party Committee, Quest Club. 



14 Cr 



St. 



JAMES JOSEPH COUGHLIN 21 Sycamore St. 

"You Walked By." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Junior 
Prom Committee, Quest Club, Football (1, 2), Track 

(3). 



RAYMOND VINCENT CONTON 161 Walnut Ave. 

"A Man and His Dreams." 
Sophomore Play Committee, Junior Prom Committee, 
Year Book Dance Committee, Quest Club, Rifle Club 
(1, 2, 3), Photography Club. 

PAULINE ELIZABETH COURY 11 Weld Ave. 

"Everything Happens to Me." 
Junior Prom Committee, Senior Party Committee, 
Quest Club (2, 3), Basketball (2, 3), Letter Club. 



ANNE ELIZABETH COSTELLO _ 49 Hoyle St. 

"Wonderful One." 
Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Party Committees, Junior 
Prom Committee, Class Day Committee, Senior Play 
Committee, Year Book Dance Committee, Dramatic 
Club, Quest Club, Photography Club, Tennis (1, 2, 3), 
Basketball (1), Traffic Squad. 

ELEANOR RUTH DAVENPORT 62 Cypress St. 

"Davenport Blues." 
Sophomore and Senior Party Committees, Sophomore 
Play, Class Day Committee, Senior Play Usher, Quest 
Club, Dramatic Club, Tennis (1), Sophomore Home 
Room Representative. 




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MARGARET LOUISE DAVOL 426 Prospect St. 

"Moonlight on the River Colorado." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Sophomore 
Play, Junior Prom Committee, Class Day Committee, 
Senior Play Committee, Traffic Squad, Quest Club, 
Dramatic Club, Debating Club, Tennis (2, 3), Class 
Secretary (1), Cheerleader. 

JULIA ANNE DILLON 20 Grant Ave. 

"Because of You." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Quest 
Club, Orchestra (2, 3), Photography Club (1), Tennis. 



FREDERICK THOMAS DEEB 112 Cedar St. 

"Who's Yahoodi?" 
Sophomore Partv Committee, lunior Prom Committee, 
Quest Club, Letter Club, Football (1, 2), Basketball (1, 2), 
Tennis (1, 2, 3). 

EDWARD LEO DONOVAN 24 Rock St. 

"The Cowboy and the Lady." 
Sophomore and Senior Party Committees, Junior 
Prom Committee, Graduation LTsher, Ring Com- 
mittee, Quotation's Committee Year Book, Quest 
Club Representative (1, 3), Traffic Squad (Captain), 
Football (Co-Captain 3), Baseball (1, 2, 3), Basket- 
ball (1, 2, 3), Track (3), Ind. Hockey Team (1, 2, 3), 
Letter Club, Picture Committee, A. A. Council (2, 3). 



CALVIN JOSEPH DeROMA 179 Nichols St. 

"Clarinet Polka." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Head Usher 
Graduation, Year Book Dance Committee, Advertising 
Committee Year Book, Quest Club, Orchestra (1, 3), 
Band (1, 2), Baseball (2, 3), Football (3), Indoor Track 
(3), Letter Club. 

LAURENCE EDWARD DONLAN 7 Baker St. 

"Little Man — What Now?" 
Traffic Squad, Quest Club, Football, Track. 



DANIEL THOMAS DEVINE 23 Monroe St. 

"Now I Lay Me Down to Dream." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Junior Prom 
Committee, Quest Club. 

JAMES JOSEPH DONOVAN, JR. 27 Phillips Ave. 

"Ain't Gain Nowhere." 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior Party Committees, 
Junior Prom Committee, Graduation Usher, Senior 
Play Committee, Quest Club, Varsity Club, Home 
Room Representative (2), Football (3). 



FLORENCE BARBARA DEVINE 9 K St. 

"Mexican Jumping Bean." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Ring Committee, Year 
Book Dance Committee, Quest Club, Tennis. 

MARGARET C. DONOVAN __ 92 Walpole St. 

"You're the One." 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior Party Committees, 
Sophomore Play, Junior Prom Usher, Class Day 
Committee, Year Book Dance Committee, Senior 
Play Committee, Quest Club, Class Treasurer (2), 
Columbus Day Essay Prize Winner. 



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FRANK A. DOVIDAUSKIS, JR. 27 Weld Ave. 

"Did Your Mother Come from Ireland?" 
Quest Clul>. 

MARY LOUISE FEAVER 75 Washington St. 

"I'm Gelling Sentimental Over You." 

Sophomore, Junior and Senior Party Committee, 
Senior Play Usher, Quest Club, Ski Club (2). 



CARMELA THERESA FABIAN1 II Lenox Ave. 

"0 Solo Mio." 
Junior and Senior Party Committees, Sophomore Play 
Committee, Quest Club. 



ARTHUR NORMAN FERGUSON 
"All Ashore." 



53 Oak Rd. 



RICHARD F. FARDY, JR. 

"The Child Prodigy." 
Basketball Manager (1, 2, 3). 



675 Neponset St. 



JOHN JOSEPH FLAHERTY, JR. 30 Granite St. 

"So You re the One." 
Sophomore and Senior Party Committees, Sophomore 
Play Committee, Junior Prom Committee, Graduation 
Usher, Senior Play Committee, Year Book Dance 
Committee, Year Book Advertising Committee, Quest 
Club, Dramatic Club. 



GEORGE HORTON FARNHAM, JR. 358 Lenox St. 

"Boy Meets Horn." 
Sophomore and Senior Party Committees, Junior Prom 
Committee, Senior Play Committee, Orchestra (1, 2, 3), 
Band (1, 2, 3), Home Room Representative (2, 3), Quest 
Club. 

MARY ELIZABETH FLAHERTY 230 Lenox St. 

"Let Me Call You Sweetheart." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Sophomore 
Play Committee, Senior Play Committee, Year Book 
Advertising Committee, Quest Club, Dramatic Club, 
Voice Training. 

OLGA MARY PATCH _ 24 Oolah Ave. 

"It's All in a Love Time." 
Sophomore and Senior Party Committee, Year Book 
Advertising Committee, Quist Club. 

ANN ELIZABETH F. JOD ^ 15 Highland St. 

"Lady wit Red Hair." 
Sophomore, Junior ai d Senior Party Committees, 
Sophomore Play Comn.ittee, Junior Prom Committee, 
Class Day Committee, Senior Play Committee, Year 
Book Advertising Committee, Traffic Squad, Quest 
Club, Dramatic Club, Debating Club (1, 2), Band 
(1,2,3), Basketball (2). 




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MATTHEW FRANCIS FOLEY 38 Cleveland St. 

"That Man is Here Again." 
Sophomore Play Committee, Quest Club. 

ELEANOR P. GIAMPA 15 Cross St. 

"Especially for You." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committee, Quest Club. 



KATHLEEN A. FRANKLIN 86 Casey St. 

"I'll Take You Home Again Kathleen." 
Quest Club, Voice Training. 

BARBARA ELIZABETH GOVE 11 Day St. 

"In An Eighteenth Century Drawing Room." 
Traffic Squad. 



INEZ J. GALLAZZI 427 Pleasant St. 

"At Least You Could Say Hello." 
Senior Party Committee, Year Book Advertising Com- 
mittee, Quest Club. 

MARY J. GUILLEMETTE 287 Nahatan St. 

"You're as Pretty as Your Pictures." 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior Partv Committees, 
Orchestra (1, 2, 3), Band (1, 2, 3), Quest Club, Voice 
Training (2, 3), Co-Art Editor Year Book. 



PRISCILLA JEAN GARDNER 3 Day St. 

"Ma, He's Making Eyes at Me." 
Junior and Senior Party Committees, Junior Prom Com- 
mittee, Quest Club. 

THERESA MARIE GULLA 476 Washington St. 
"/ Want the Waiter." 



RUSSELL JAMES GARLAND ^ 182 Dean St. 

"Curly Top." 
Traffic Squad, Quest Club. 

ETHEL LOUISE GUSTAFSON _ 147 Winslow Ave. 

"/ Hear a Rhapsody." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Sophomore 
Play Committee, Junior Prom Usher, Year Book 
Dance Committee, Business Manager Year Book, 
Traffic Squad, Quest Club, Representative, Varsity 
Club, Tennis Team (1, 2, 3), Basketball (1, 2), Class 
Vice President (1, 2, 3), Cheerleader. 



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DONALD G. HAMLIN 362 Washington St. 

"The Little Man Who Wasn't There" 
Sophomore Party Committee, Quest Club. 

MARY MARGARET HAYES 185 Pleasant St. 

"We 'Two'." 
Sophomore and Senior Party Committees, Senior Play 
Usher, Traffic Squad, Quest Club, Dramatic Club, 
Tennis (1). 



JEAN A. HANSEN 25 Hoyle St. 

"Jennie With the Light Brown Hair." 
Senior Plav Committee, Quest Club, Tennis (1, 2, 3), 
Basketball (1, 2, 3), Ticket Seller. 

ROBERT JOHN HENNESSEY 97 Cross St. 

' 'Hennessey Tennessey Toots the Flute-' 
Quest Club. 



WILLIAM JOSEPH HARRINGTON 70 Monroe St. 

' 'I Could Write a Book." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Sophomore Play Committee, 
Junior Prom Committee, 1941 Class Day Committee, 
Orchestra (1, 2), Traffic Squad, Quest Club. 

CHARLES ROBERT HENRY 52 Prospect Ave. 

"Where Do Yon Keep Your Heart?" 
Traffic Squad, Quest Club, Washington and Franklin 
History Medal. 



EARLE COLBURN HARTSHORN 130 Monroe St. 

"Giddy ap, Giddyap, Giddyap, Whoa!" 
Quest Club. 

DOROTHY HERMANSON _ 27 Folan Ave. 

"You're in the Army Now." 
Sophomore Party Committee. Junior Prom Commit- 
tee, Year Book Advertising. 



MARGARET MARY HAYES 185 Pleasant St. 

"Tea for Two." 
Sophomore and Senior Party Committees, Senior Play 
Committee, Year Book Advertising Committee, 1941 
Class Dav Committee, Dramatic Club, Quest Club, Ticket 
Seller. 

BARBARA G. HOOD 428 Washington St. 

"My Heart is Taking Lessons." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Class Day 
Committee, Senior Play Committee, Home Room 
Representative (2), Class Secretary (3), Year Book 
Dance Committee, Traffic Squad, Dramatic Club, Ski 
Club (2), Quest Club. 




21 



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HALEM HOWARD 1113 Washington St. 

"The Shiek of Araby." 
Sophomore Play Committee, Junior Prom Committee, 
Senior Play Committee. 

STANLEY G. KALIESAUSKAS_ 18 Folan Ave. 

"I'm a Killer Diller." 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior Party Committees, 
Year Book Dance Committee, Year Book Advertising 
Committee, Quest Club, Track, Basketball. 



ERINA M. IPPOLITI 



139 Monroe St. 



Sophomore, Junior and Senior Party Committees, Senior 
Play Committee, Year Book Advertising Committee. 
Photography Club (3), Quest Club, Basketball (1, 2, 3), 
Tennis (2, 3). 



CONSTANCE KALLGREN 
"Blondie." 
Junior Prom Committee. 



39 Chapel St. 



ETHEL ARL1NE JACKSON _ 121 Winslow Ave. 

"Take It, Jackson!" 
Sophomore Party Committee, Benefit Concert Committee, 
Debating Club (2, 3), Tennis (3). 

HERBERT A. KALLSTROM 15 Johnson Court. 

"Ah, Sweet Mystery of Life." 
Traffic Squad, Quest Club. 



BARBARA JEAN JOHNSON 8 Morse Ave. 

"Oh, Johnny!" 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior Party Committees, Junior 
Prom Committee, Class Day Committee, Senior Play 
Committee, Traffic Squad, Quest Club, Ski Club (1, 2), 
Tennis (1, 2). 

MARY STEPHANIE KARKOTA 12 Hillside Ave. 
"Mary Had a Little Lamb (in Camp Edwards)." 
Quest Club. 



EVA JEANNETTE JURGEVICH 
"They Say." 
Quest Club. 



5 Atwood Ave. 



32 Wi 



St. 



ALEXANDER JOHN KAVALL 

"Slow Freight." 
Year Book Quotations Committee, Quest Club, Foot 
ball (1, 3). 



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JULLIEANNA KAZULIS 555 Pleasant St. 

^ "Hit 'Em High." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Sophomore Play Committee, 
Quest Club, Basketball (1, 2, 3),Tennis(2, 3), Voice Train- 
ing (1, 2,3). 

MARIE ANNE KING 371 Nahatan St. 

"Queen of My Heart" 
Junior Party Committee, Quest Club, 



CARLETON HENRY KEELER 392 Washington St. 

"I'll See You in My Drams." 
Sophomore Play Committee, Traffic Squad, Quest Club, 
Rifle Cluli, Photography Club, Track. 

RAY F. KINNEY 45 Chapel Court. 

"I'll Never Smile Again." 
Quest Club. 



JOSEPH ROBERT KELLEY 72 Winslow Ave. 

"Kelley With the Green Necktie." 
Quest Club. 

AIRE KARINA KOSKI 12 Savin Ave. 

"Dinner for Two, Please James." 
Junior Prom Committee, Class Day Committee, Year 
Book Dance Committee, Senior Plav, Traffic Squad, 
Quest Club, Basketball (1). 



WINSLOW GILBERT KEYES 313 Winter St. 

"I'm Going to Lock My Heart, and Throw Away the Keyes." 

JOSEPH BENEDICT KUDIRKA 31 Franklin St. 

"Picture Me and Picture You." 
Traffic Squad, Photography Club, Quest Club. 



JOHN J. KIANDER 32 Adams St. 

"You Must Have Been a Beautiful Baby." 
Sophomore Play Committee, Junior Party Committee, 
Junior Prom Committee, Class Day Committee, Year 
Book Advertising Committee. 



PATRICIA ANNE LANE 

"Strawberry Lane." 
Quest Club. 



9 Atwood Ave. 




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THERESA MARIE LANGLOIS 64 Nichols St. 

"0 Solo Mio." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Junior Prom 
Committee, Senior Play Committee, Year Book Advertising 
Committee, Traffic Squad, Quest Club, Photography Club, 
Orchestra, Band. 

HELEN JOYCE MACHUM 305 Winter St. 

"You Make 'Urn, We'll Sell 'Urn." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Junior Prom Usher, 
Year Book Dance Committee, Quest Club, Photog- 
raphy Club (2), Debating Club (3). 



ANNIE LANZONI 174 Neponset St. 

"One In a Million." 
Junior Prom Committee, Quest Club, Basketball (2, 3), 
Tennis (1,2,3). 

MARY ELIZABETH MAGUIRE 23 Williams St. 

"Chatterbox." 
Quest Club. 



JOHN C. LEAHY 126 Monroe St. 

"Where Are You Working, John?" 
Quest Club. 

JAMES F. MARONEY 11 Hillside Ave. 

"You 'Super -Man." 
Quest Club. 



NANCY WITTON LEAVIS 49 Elm St. 

"Sweet Someone." 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior Party Committees, Sopho- 
more Play Committee, Junior Prom Committee, Class Day 
Committee, Year Book Dance Committee, Senior Play 
Committee, Quest Club, Debating (1). 

BARBARA ANN MARTIN 7 Elliot St. 

"A Pretty Girl is Like a Melody'' 
Sophomore Party Committee, Sophomore Play Com- 
mittee, Quest Club. 



CHARLES DAVID LOGUE 82 Walnut Ave. 

"Sympathy." 
Sophomore Play, Junior Party Committee, Junior Prom 
Committee, Senior Play, Traffic Squad, Quest Club, Home 
Room Representative (1). 

GERALD B. MATTHEWS 43 Hillside Ave. 

"/ Never Took a Lesson in My Life." 
Quest Club, Baseball Manager (1), Home Room 
Representative. 



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CELIA MAX 1076 Washington St. 

"Cecilia." 
Sophomore and Junior Party, Quest Clul>. 

BERNICE J. McLACHEY 693 Pleasant St. 

"You're as Pretty as a Picture." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Sophomore 
Play Committee, Junior Prom Committee, Year Book 
Dance Committee, Quest Club, Dramatic Clul>, 
Photography Club, Basketball (1). 



FRANCIS EDWARD McAULIFFE 327 Railroad Ave. 

"The Five O'clock Whiffle." 
Sophomore Play, Senior Plav, Traffic Squad, Quest Club, 
Track (1, 2\ 

ROBERT BRUCE MEAGHER 79 Nichols St. 

"It's a Sin to Telia Lie." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Sophomore Class Trea- 
surer, Quest Club, Football (1, 2, 3), Indoor Track 
(1,2, 3), Outdoor Track (1,2,3), Rifle Club (2, 3). 



MARIE ANN McDONOUGH 262 Lenox St. 

' 'Song of Independence." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Senior Plav Usher, Quest 
Club. 

KATHLEEN MARIE MEISSNER 17 Nichols St. 

"My (S) Buddy." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Sophomore 
Play, Junior Prom Committee, Class Day Committee 
('40), Senior Dance Committee, Home Room Repre- 
sentative (1, 2), Representative Quest Club (1, 2), 
Senior Play Committee, Class Gift Committee, Traffic 
Squad, Cheerleader (2), Captain Cheerleaders (3), 
Tennis (2, 3) 



PAULINE McKELVEY 32 Grant Ave. 

' 'Sweet and Lovely." 
Sophomore Play Committee, Junior Party Committee, 
Quest Club, Photography Club. 



MARY FRANCES MICKENZIE 

"He's My Man." 
Senior Play Usher, Quest Club, Tennis. 



5 Cross St. 



ANNE LORETTA McKEOWN 122 Fulton St. 

"Slap Happy Lassy." 
Sophomore, Junior, Senior Party Committees, Senior, 
Play Committee, Senior Dance Committee, Quest Club. 

MARY ADELE MICKUNAS 153 Winslow Ave. 

"My Heart Belongs to Daddy." 
Senior Dance, Quest Club. 




25 



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W. GEORGE MIKE 26 St. George Ave. 

' 'Would You Manage My Heart?" 
Quest Club, Basketball (1), Football Manager (1, 2, 3), 
Baseball Manager (1, 2, 3). 

LEO FRANCIS MULVEHILL 107 Monroe St. 

"Soap Gels In My Eyes." 
Sophomore Play, Quest Club, Track (1). 



HELEN B. MILOSZEWSKI 

"/ Could Kiss You for Thai.' 
Class Day Committee ('40), Quest Club. 



23 Dean St. 



St. 



EDWARD PHILIP MURPHY 98 H 

"When the Sweet Potatoe Piper Plays." 
Senior Dance Committee, Home Room Representa- 
tive (3), Traffic Squad, Writer Class Prophecy, Quest 
Club, Football (1, 2, 3), Basketball (1, 2, 3), Baseball 
(1, 2, 3), Track (1). 



JAMES LAWRENCE MONAHAN 314 Nahatan St. 

" 'Cause My Feet's Too Big." 
Sophomore Play, Senior Party Committee, Usher Junior 
Prom, Senior Dance Committee, Class Day Committee 
('40), Quest Club, Award Veterans of Foreign Wars Essay 
Contest, Award Knights of Columbus Essay Contest, 
Football (2), Tennis (2, 3), Baseball (2), Basketball (2), 
Varsity Club. 



KATHERINE MARY MURPHY 

"My One Romance." 
Quest Club. 



30 Winfield St. 



LOUISE ANNE MONDOR 20 Monroe St. 

"I Do, Do You?" 
Junior Prom Committee, Class Day Committee ('40), 
Senior Dance Committee, Senior Play Cast, Class Gift 
Committee, Traffic Squad, Quest Club. 

PHYLLIS A. NORLING 18 West St. 

"If I Had My Way." 
Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Party Committees, 
Sophomore Play, Junior Prom Committee, Senior 
Play Committee, Debating Club (Secretary), Tennis 
(1), Quest Club. 




MARY ELIZABETH MULLANE 68 Howard St. 

"Gotta 'Stone', in My Shoe." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Senior Party Committee, 
Senior Dance Committee, Class Gift Committee, Quest 
Club. 

MARTIN EDWARD NORTON 72 Prospect Ave. 

"Ain't Cha Coming Out?" 
Sophomore Party Committee, Senior Play Committee, 
Home Room Representative (2), Traffic Squad, 
Quest Club, Football (1, 2, 3), Track (3), Golf (2). 



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1 94 1 



JOAN ELIZABETH NOTARANGELO 27 Cedar St. 

"If You Ever Change Your Mind." 
Sophomore Play, Junior Prom Committee, Class Day 
Committee ('40), Senior Dance Committee, Quest Club. 



TERESA AGNESS O'MALLAY 

"Rose of Tni/ee." 
Quest Cluh, Senior Play Usher. 



26 Press Ave" 



MARY THERESA NUTTALL 144 Walpole St. 

"All Ike Things You Are." 
Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Party Committees, Sopho- 
more Play, Junior Prom Committee, Reception to Seniors 
Committee, Senior Play Committee, Senior Dance Com- 
mittee, Traffic Squad, Co-Art Editor Year Book, Class 
Prophet, Dramatic Club, Quest Club, Basketball (1, 2), 
Tennis (1,2, 3). 

ROBERT EMMET O'NEIL, JR. 7 Monroe St. 

' 'Mutiny in the Brass Section.' ' 
Sophomore Plav, Usher Junior Prom, Senior Play, 
Orchestra (1, 2), Band (1, 2, 3), Rifle Club (2,3), 
Quest Club, Intramural Basketball (3), Golf Team (3). 



ELIZABETH MARGARET O'CONNOR 25 Oak Rd. 

"Simple and Sweet." 
Junior Party Committee, Senior Play Committee, Traffic 
Squad, Quest Club, Basketball (1), Tennis (1). 

MARY AGNES O'TOOLE 21 Elliot St. 

"I'll Sing Your Praises." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Quest Club. 



NORA HELEN O'DONNELL 67 Adams St. 

"The Door to My Heart." 
Junior Party Committee, Quest Club. 

ERNEST ORLANDO PACLUCCI 418 Nahatan St. 

"Heigho, Heigho, As Off to Work We Go." 
Debating Club (3), Quest Club, Track (1). 



MARY ELIZABETH O'LEARY 18 Prospect St. 

"My Wild Irish Rose." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Class Day Committee, 
Senior Play Usher, Quest Club. 

FRANCIS T. PAQUETTE 285 Nahatan St. 

"Bugle Call Rag." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Quest Club, 
Football (2, 3), Baseball (2, 3), Golf Team. 




27 



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ROBERT FRANCIS PAQUETTE 285 Nahatan St. 

"I Only Want a Buddy, Not a Gal." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Quest Club, Baseball (1, 2), 
Football (1), Track (1). 

GEORGE E. PHALEN 13 Cedar St. 

"Come Out Of Your Shell." 
Junior Prom Committee, Quest Club, Traffic Squad, 
Basketball (1, 2, 3), Baseball (1, 2). 



ALBERT LUCIF.N PELLETIER 12 Granite St. 

"The Last Time I Saw Paris." 
Quest Club, Intramural Basketball (2, 3), Golf (1), Track 
(1,2). 

WALTER JAMES PHALEN 46 Harding Rd. 

"A Little Bit Independent." 
Junior Prom Committee, Quest Club, Track (2), 
Basketball (1,2). 



DOROTHY ELISABETH PENDERGAST 74 Elliot St. 

"/ Poured My Heart Into a Song." 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior Party Committees, Junior 
Prom Committee, Quest Club Board, Tennis (1, 2, 3), 
Cheerleader. 

ELIZABETH CLAIRE PRAINO 191 Prospect St. 

"It's A Hap-Hap-Happy Day." 
Junior and Senior Party Committees, Dramatic Club 
(1), Quest Club. 



JOHN BERNARD PETRAITIS 742 Pleasant St. 

"Keep An Eye On Your Heart." 
Usher Junior Prom, Traffic Squad, Quest Club, Track 
(2, 3), Rifle Club Secretary (2, 3), President Photography 
Club (3). 



FRANK PETER PROCOPIO 

"Laugh Your Way Through Life. 
Quest Club. 



62 Oliver St. 



EDITH PRISCILLA PFIEFFER 124 Wilson St. 

"You Appeal to Me." 
Quest Club. 

CLYDE JAMES RAFUSE 1285 Washington St. 

"One In a Million." 
Quest Club. 



28 



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1 94 1 



BRONSIK ANN RASIMOVICH 24 St. |ohn St. 

"On the Hall" 
Year Book Advertising Committee, Quest Club, Basketball 
(1, 2, 3), Tennis. 

HENRY RICHARDS 13 Dean St. 

"I've Hitched My Wagon to a Shir." 
Traffic Squad, Quest Club, Photography Club, Town 
Planning Award. 



BARBARA ANN RAYMOND 24 Shaw St. 

"You Grow Sweeter As the Years Go By." 
Class Day Committee, Senior Play Committee, Quest Club. 

DOROTHY M. RICHARDSON 65 Winslow Ave. 

"She's the Leader of the Band." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Sophomore 
Play Committee, Junior Prom Committee, Senior Play- 
Usher, Year Book Advertising Committee, Year Book 
Dance Committee, Quest Club, Band (1,2, 3), Band 
Drummaior (3), Basketball (1, 2, 3), Tennis (1, 2, 3), 
Ticket Seller (3). 



FLORENCE HELEN REHNSTROM 24 Berwick Rd. 

"You Can Depend On Me." 
Sophomore Play Committee, Junior Party Committee, 
Senior Play Committee, Traffic Squad, Quest Club. 



MARGARET VIRGINIA ROSS 

"Margie." 
Quest Club. 



23 Walnut Ave. 



RUSSELL WILLIAM RICHALL 63 Walnut Ave. 

"I Wonder Who 's Kissing Her Now." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Junior Prom Committee, 
Year Book Dance Committee, Home Room Representative 
(1, 2, 3), Traffic Squad, Basketball (1, 2, 3), Baseball 
(1, 2, 3), Football (1), Track (1, 2, 3). 

WALTER BENNETT RUSSELL 783 Neponset St. 

"Fancy Meeting You." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Year Book Dance 
Committee, Home Room Representative (2\ Class 
Treasurer (1), Quest Club, Rifle Club (1, 2, 3), Orches- 
tra (1, 2), Basketball (2, 3). 



BARBARA M. RICHARDS 192 Washington St. 

"There's Room in My Heart for Romance." 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior Party Committees, Sopho- 
more Play Committee, Junior Prom Committee, Class Day 
Committee, Senior Play Committee, Year Book Dance 
Committee, Quest Club. 

JOHN SAMM 111 Cedar St. 

"Slop You're Breaking My Heart." 
Junior Prom Committee, Year Book Dance Com- 
mittee, Quest Club, Football (1, 2, 3), Baseball (1, 2), 
Basketball (1, 2, 3). 




29 



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ALFRED SARAPAS 21 St. George St. 

"How Do I Rale With You?" 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committee, Traffic Squad, 
Quest Club, Baseball (2, 3). 

FRANCES E. SIRONKA ' 14 Quincy Ave. 

"Are You Having Any Fun" 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committee, Class Day 
Committee, Traffic Squad, Quest Club. 



HELEN ELIZABETH SEARS 8 Granite St. 

"The Glory of Love." 
Junior Party Committee, Quest Club. 

ADAM PAUL SIRVINSKY 928 Washington St. 

"Ivan Skavinski Skavar." 
Quest Club. 



ANNE MARIE SEERY 33 Cleveland St. 

"Lovely Lady." 
Sophomore and Senior Party Committees, Traffic Squad, 
Quest Club, Tennis (1). 

LEONA SKOLFIELD 368 Neponset St. 

"You've Got Something There." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Traffic Squad, Senior 
Play Committee, Quest Club. 



BLANCHE TERESA SIENKIEWICZ 95 Concord Ave. 

"Who's Sorry Now?" 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committee, Class Day Com- 
mittee, Quest Club. 

GORDON PHILIP SMALL 618 Washington St. 

"Double or Nothing." 
Quest Club, Band (1, 2, 3), Orchestra (2, 3), Rifle 
Club (1). 



ROCCO JOSEPH SILVESTRI 8 Tremont St. 

"By the 'Skin' of My Teeth." 
Quest Club. 

HAROLD LEONARD SMALL 518 Washington St. 

"Anchors Aweigh!" 
Rifle Club, Band, Orchestra. 



30 



Tl OT 



1 94 1 



BARBARA [ANE SMITH 131 Roosevelt Ave. 

"Looking For Yesterday." 
lunioi- Party Committee, Senior Play Committee, Quest 
Club. 

ANNIK II. THOMAS 1271 Washington St. 

"Mother, May I Go Out Dancing?" 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior Party Committees, 
Sophomore Play Committee, Class Day Committee, 
Year Book Dance Committee, Quest Club, Basketball, 
Captain ( 1, 2). 



EVELYN M. STERNBERG 136 Roosevelt Ave. 

"You Ought to Be in Pictures." 
Junior Party Committee, Senior Play Committee, Traffic 
Squad, Quest Club. 

GEORGE J. THOMAS 6 Tremont St. 

"Tiger Rug." 
Sophomore Play Committee, Junior Party Committee, 
Junior Prom Committee, Year Book Dance Commit- 
tee, Quest Club, Football (1, 2, 3), Baseball (1, 2), 
Basketball (1,2). 



EDWIN 1. STONE 70 Washington St. 

"To Mary With Love." 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior Party Committees, Senior 
Play Cast, Band (1, 2, 3), Orchestra'(l, 2, 3), Quest Club. 

MICHAEL J. THORNTON 373 Railroad Ave. 

"While a Cigarette Was Burning." 
Quest Club, Track (3). 



FRANCIS J. SURETTE _ 54 Hill St. 

"How'm I Doin — Hey! Hey!" 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Junior Prom 
Committee, Quest Club, Traffic Squad, Home Room Repre- 
sentative (1), Class Treasurer (2, 3), Football (1, 2, 3), 
Baseball (2). 



PATRICK TIERNEY 21 Hi 

"Oh, How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning." 
Quest Club. 



St. 



JULIA ANN SURIANO 89 WinfieJd St. 

"Take Me Out to the Ball Game." 
Quest Club, Photography (2, 3), Tennis (1). 

JAMES JACK TOMM 19 Dean St. 

"Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight." 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior Party Committee, 
Junior Prom Committee, Year Book Dance Com- 
mittee, Quest Club, Football (1, 2, 3), Basketball 
(1, 2), Baseball (1,2). 




31 



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FRANCIS ALFRED TRIVENTI 104 Cedar St. 

"Come Out, Come Out Wherever You Are." 
Sophomore Play Committee, Traffic Squad, Quest Club, 
Home Room Representative (1), Photography Club 
(1, 2, 3), Sportsmen's Club. 

EDITH OSBORN WARD 38 Florence Ave. 

"So Nice of You." 
Quest Club, Debating Club (1, 2, 3). 



CLIFFORD E. WAITE 

"Wait for Me.' 
Quest Club. 



165 East Cross St. 



VITO JOHN WASILUNAS 40 _St. James Ave. 

"High, Wide and Handsome." 
Quest Club, Orchestra (1, 2, 3), Band (1, 2, 3). 



HELEN MARIE WALL 316 Nahatan St. 

"When Irish Eyes Are Smiling." 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior Party Committees, Senior 
Play Usher, Quest Club. 

FRANCES P. WETTA 1150 Washington St. 

"Alouetta." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Sophomore Play 
Committee, Junior Prom Committee, Year Book 
Advertising Committee, Traffic Squad, Quest Club, 
Home Room Representative (2, 3), Columbus Day 
Essay Prize Winner. 



ELIZABETH MARGARET WALSH 13 Morse St. 

"A Pretty Girl Is Like a Melody." 
Junior Prom Committee, Quest Club. 

ALICE S. WHEDON 48 East Vernon St. 

"Sophisticated Lady." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Year Book Dance Com- 
mittee, Traffic Squad, Quest Club. 



EMMA VIRGINIA WALTER 39 Highview St. 

"Ma, He's Making Eyes at Me." 
Junior Prom Committee, Senior Play Usher, Quest Club, 
Basketball (1,2). 

LOUISE K. WOZNIAK 80 Morse St. 

"/ Double Dare You." 
Sophomore Party Committee, Quest Club, Basket- 
ball (1). 



32 



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1 94 1 



AHTI JOHN WUORI 90 East Cross St. 

"Little Man You've Had a Busy Day." 
Quest Club. 

VICTOR ZILAITIS 1110 Washington St. 

'Why Don't You Practice What You Preach." 
Quest Club. 



MARION E. ZEPFLER 62 Highland St. 

"/ Can't Resist Yon." 
Sophomore and Junior Party Committees, Sophomore Play 
Committee, Junior Prom Committee, Year Book Dance 
Committee, Quest Club, Tennis (1,2, 3). 

HELEN ZUKE S3 Sturtevant Ave. 

"The Nightingale Sang." 

Sophomore and Junior Party Committee, Sophomore 
Play Committee, Junior Prom Usher, Senior Play 
Committee, Year Book Dance Committee, Year Book 
Advertising Committee, Class Secretary (2), Class 
Treasurer (3), Quest Club Representative, Traffic 
Squad, Basketball (1, 2, 3). 








WORDS 

Words are funny things. 

They can be — 

As slippery as green slimy rocks 

Washed by the endless tides of the sea; 

Or as radiant as sunshine 

Bursting through clouds on a dull day; 

Or as hard as the granite hills of New Hampshire; 

Or as exquisite and delicate as the petals of an orchid. 

Dorothy Carpenter, '41. 
Accepted by Scholastic 



33 



194 1 TIOT 

THE HISTORY OF THE CLASS 

Within recent years many events of history have been thrillingly re-lived by 
means of the moving picture. Since it is the desire of our class to be progressive 
in every way, it would seem fitting to have our class history in picture form, also. 
However, lacking as we do, the technical equipment for this, we shall make our 
pictures mental ones, operated through the imagination. 

The first scene which flashes upon our minds has for its back-ground the 
Norwood High School gymnasium one bright, sunshiny day in the September of 
1938. A group of 230 awed sophomores, prodded on by the example of the juniors, 
stumble to their feet as the seniors enter. Mr. Thompson rises to say a few intro- 
ductory words, after which the school song is sung. How thrilled those sophomores 
look to be singing this familiar song which has now become their own! Mercifully, 
the camera does not follow the sophomores out into the wide halls, allowing them 
to go through the trials and tribulations of the first few days without observation. 

It is one month later, and again we see the high school gymnasium, this time 
invaded with a more festive air. Along the benches sit the sophomores — the girls 
chattering and giggling nervously, the bovs looking rather pained. Notables among 
the crowd include: Class President, William Butters; and other officers: Louise 
Gustafson, Margaret Davol, Bennett Russell, Betty Zephler, and Rocco Silvestri. 
There is a burst of music, and in prance those irresistible characters, the Seven 
Dwarfs, perfectly imitated by seven girls. A hilarious evening of entertainment 
follows — at least, judging by the laughter on all sides, everyone is enjoying himself. 
High lights of the evening are the relay races in which the teachers steal the show. 
Just look at Mr. Kenefick, choking over that cracker! 

There is another flick of the camera and we see seven hundred students as- 
sembled at the Junior High School, their eyes glued upon the stage where the 
sophomores, who are in charge of the program, for their first time, are presenting 
the annual Christmas play. Leo Mulvehill, Anne Flood, Kay Meissner, and 
Charles Logue are carrying out their parts splendidly, and just hear that applause! 

The next scene takes place in the September of 1939 upon the high school steps. 
There are the juniors, madly rushing hither and yon, greeting their friends after 
the summer separation. They are quite at ease now, presenting a contrast to their 
frightened appearance of a year ago. It looks as though they are discussing some- 
thing very pleasant, possibly the events to come in the junior year. 

The scene shifts, and once again we see the gymnasium lighted up, this time 
for the Junior Party. Class officers whom we see this year include: William 
Butters, President for the second time, and Louise Gustafson, Helen Zuke, Mar- 
garet Donovan, Francis Surette, and Edward Donovan. The entertainment this 
time seems to be in the form of a radio play, originated by Mary Nuttall, our class 
playwright, and based upon the life of Columbus. Helen Zuke, our class songbird, 
Dorothy Pendergast, and other talented members of the class are up front, doing 
a fine piece of work. The play finishes and dancing gets under way rapidly, which 
situation is perhaps explained by the fact that the girls are taking advantage of 
Leap Year and getting the boys out on the floor. What a change one year has 
wrought in the dancing ability of these juniors! 

We now see the most beautiful scene of all before us, the Junior Promenade. 
The gymnasium is shrouded in an atmosphere of beauty and mystery, achieved 
through the Spanish moss and scenic effects cleverly arranged to represent a Florida 
jungle. The soft music, the beautiful gowns, then finally, the climax of the evening, 
the grand march, make this prom an unforgettable experience. Especially is this 
true for the juniors who have for their first time carried on a public, social function, 
and with great success. 

Now, the juniors have returned as seniors, and the scene is the Junior High 
School, where a full house is waiting to see the Senior Play, entitled "Our Girls". 

34 



Tl OT 194 1 

The play has begun, and did you ever see a group of people more convulsed wifh 
laughter than this audience? The play is one of the most successful in years, and 
small wonder since the cast including Edwin Stone, Marjorie Bodge, Evelyn Stern- 
berg, Aira Koski, Charles Logue, Robert O'Neil, George Farnham, Louise Monder, 
and Barbara Hood has done a marvelous piece of acting, under the direction of 
Miss Peabody. Charles Logue, Robert O'Neil and George Farnham dressed in 
long curls, ribbons, dresses, silk stockings and high heels are enough to convulse 
any audience even without their inimitable antics. 

The camera cannot quite do justice to the expressions of dismay, incredulity, 
and disappointment upon the faces of the seniors when the Thanksgiving game 
with Dedham is, tor the first time, canceled because of snow. This is one of the 
saddest experiences of the senior year. 

It would not do to picture the senior year without picturing one of the most 
eagerly anticipated and most joyous occasions of all, the annual Christmas Quest 
Club party. All classes participate in this party, but the seniors are given the 
greatest responsibility. In the gym there is a beatuiful Christmas tree and there 
are stacks of toys, books, and articles of clothing attractively arranged. The doors 
open and in march lines of tiny tots, who are to have the time of their lives playing 
games, singing songs, and seeing Santa at this party. Strange to say, the faces of 
the Questors are just as happy as those of their small charges. 

Another unforgettable scene recorded upon the film, is that of six girls clad 
in the "bloomer effect" gym suit of the gay nineties, kicking out exercises upon the 
floor. This is merely one part of the entertainment presented at the Senior Party 
on Valentine's Day. Dancing seems to be the major interest of this evening. Class 
officers this year are: President, Donald Cody; Vice-President, Louise Gustafson; 
Secretary, Barbara Hood; Boys' Treasurer, Francis Surette; Girls' Treasurer, 
Helen Zuke; A. A. Council Representative, Edward Donovan. The general verdict 
as the seniors leave the room seems to be that this has been the best party held 
during the entire three years. 

We are now presented with a brief series of glimpses of some other activities 
of the senior year. In one room we find the vocational class which has a most 
valuable and practical purpose and which many girls have entered of their own 
free will, meeting under the direction of Miss Gow. In another room we see a 
group of girls making bandages under the direction of Miss Canning, in charge of 
this newly organized and highly satisfactory Red Cross class. In Mr. Thompson's 
office we see the Editorial Staff, including Co-Editors Marjorie Bodge and Marion 
Bailey; Art Editors, Mary Nuttall and Mary Guillmette; Chairman of the Pho- 
tography Committee, Donald Cody; and Business Manager, Dorothy Carpenter, 
at work on the year book. 

There is one scene which we alone, as seniors, are priviliged to witness; a scene 
which has a great and wonderful significance for the girls and some of the boys of 
Norwood. This is the construction of the Peabody School of vocational training 
which will directly adjoin the high school. It is a great honor to have this school 
located in Norwood, and we are watching its construction with much pride and 
interest. 

Some of the best scenes of all cannot be recorded, for at the time of this writing, 
they are still events of the future. However, these are scenes which will remain in 
the minds of us all in spite of the fact that we shall have no historical record of 
them. There is the Senior Spring Dance, or the Year Book Dance, for which all 
sorts of preparations are now being made. There is the Senior Promenade, that 
most anticipated of all social functions at high school. Then come the banquet, 
and graduation, and our history of life in high school is closed forever. 

Marion Bailey, 
Class Historian 

35 



1 941 



TIOT 




MECHANICAL DRAWING 




TYPEWRITING 



36 



1941 TIOT 



JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY 

In October, 1939, members of the Class of '42 elected their first class officers as 
follows: 

President, Martin Curran Vice President, Paul Murphy 

Secretary, Mary Drummey A. A. Council, Paul Barbier 

Boys' Treasurer, John Bonica Girls' Treasurer, Vera Daunt 

December saw the happy occasion of the Sophomore Party. In the High 
School Gymnasium, an amateur hour of sorts was followed by dancing. That little 
party confirmed our doubtful position as members of the Norwood Senior High 
School. 

The September of the year 1940 ushered most of us into our Junior year. The 
officers elected were: 

President, Paul Murphy Vice President, William Costello 

Secretary, Ruth Steele A. A. Council, Paul Bernier 

Boys' Treasurer, George Hillman Girls' Treasurer, Vera Daunt 

Our second Party — the Junior Party — included song contests between two 
"inimitable" Glee Clubs during the beginning of the evening, and dancing at the 
end to soothe us all. Why did we need soothing? Who wouldn't, after seeing a 
parade of boys imitate the opposite sex in blue gym suits, pink evening gowns, and 
such. 

February found lots of us in a dilemma, because the big date was approaching. 
We found that we were "green" in so far as Proms were concerned. But we managed 
to survive, and the gymnasium under its coating of hearts and flowers ; combined 
with the orchestra, to make us swing and sway properly. Which, I assure you, we 
did. 

Now we look forward to the Junior Reception to the Seniors. May we receive 
successfully! 

Ruth Steele, '42. 



38 




^ 



1 941 



TIOT 



JUNIOR GIRLS 



Anthony, Dolores 
Armstrong, Helen 
Beasley, Helen 
Baranoska, Josephine 
Balduf, Bertha 
Bouchard, Barbara 
Boulis, Sophie 
Brennan, Phyllis 
Bunker, Jean 
Burns, Eleanor 
Butler, Irene 
Butler, Mary 
Byko, Helen 
Byrne, Dorothy 
Byrne, Lillian 
Calderone, Emma 
Campbell, Catherine 
Carlson, Helen 
Chamberlain, Jeannette 
Charron, Margaret 
Cistrinelli, Gilda 
Cloherty, Barbara 
Collins, Mary 
Concannon, Barbara 
Conley, Muriel 
Connelly, Mary 
Connolly, Mary 
Conton, Barbara 
Cook, Carolyn 
Cormier, Helen 
Costello, Barbara 
Coyne, Patricia 
Curran, Mary 
Daley, Margaret 
Dalton, Lorraine 



Damico, Mary 
Daunt, Veronica 
Deeb, Frances 
Deeb, Marion 
D'Espinosa, Rita 
D'Espinosa, Ruth 
Devine, Catherine 
DiBerto, Lola 
Dillon, Mary 
Disnard, Mary 
Domet, Sadie 
Driscoll, Mary 
Drummey, Mary 
Duane, Alice 
Eklof, Elsie 
Esper, Catherine 
Flaherty, Catherine 
Flaherty, Helen 
Flaherty, Margaret Ann 
Flood, Margaret 
Foley, Mary 
Gardner, Marjorie 
Garner, Mary 
Geroso, Arline 
Golden, Dorothy 
Grosso, Angelina 
Grugnale, Mary 
Harrington, Therese 
Hayes, Mary 
Hills, Betty 
Johnson, Ethel 
Johnson, Evelyn 
Johnson, Lillian 
Kallgren, Constance 
Karol, Lillian 



Kimball, Marie 
Kimball, Marion 
Kelley, Ida 
Joseph, Madeline 
Larson, Norma 
Larusso, Josephine 
Lonergan, Priscilla 
Lowe, Bernice 
Macaulay, Elizabeth 
MacKenney, Phyllis 
Maguire, Barbara 
Martowska, Jennie 
Masino, Marianne 
McDavitt, Patricia 
McDonough, Ann 
McDonough, Mary Ellen 
McDonough, Rosemary 
McGrath, Helen 
McLatchey, Annamarie 
McLatchey, Rita 
Meyer, Agnes 
Mike, Catharine 
Muehlberger, Lois 
Murphy, Alice 
Murphy, Vivian 
Nikituk, Mary 
O'Brien, Josephine 
Palmerine, Rose 
Palsic, Mary 
Patinsky, Frances 
Oelachlagel, Gladys 
Patterson, Jeanne 
Pendergast, Margaret 
Petrovick, Frieda 
Phalen, Catherine 



Praino, Mary 
Puopolo, Sabina 
Rehnstrom, Corinne 
Richardson, Betty 
Richardson, Florence 
Ruscio, Catherine 
Russel, Leona 
Ryan, Dorothy 
Salloom, Anne 
Salmon, Teresa 
Samson, Gertrude 
Sears, Margaret 
Simoni, Margorie 
Smith, Viola 
Spearwater, Shirley 
Steele, Ruth 
Stepanoivich, Shirley 
Sullivan, Mary 
Suriano, Frances 
Tarpey, Veronica 
Thomas, Margaret 
Traquair, Hazel 
Trask, Blanche 
Ufheil, Daisy 
Valatka, Helen 
Wallace, Mary 
Walsh, Margaret M. 
Walsh, Winifred M. 
Webber, Marion 
Wenstrom, Priscilla 
White, Mary B. 
Wiseman, Ruth 
Worster, Elizabeth 
Yelapi, Rose 
Zizis, Lena 



JUNIOR BOYS 



Adelmann, John 
Alexandrowic, Anthon 
Allen, John L. 
Anderson, Charles F. 
Babcock, Russell 
Balduf, Curtis 
Benedetti, Edward 
Bernier, Paul 
Bodge, Robert 
Bonica, Donald 
Breen, Joseph 
Brock, George 
Carlson, Knute 
Carroll, Francis 
Chubet, Vincent 
Cleary, Paul 
Conley, Edward 
Connolly, Joseph 
Conroy, John 
Corcoran, John 
Costello, William 
Coyne, Joseph 
Crites, James 

40 



Curran, Martin 
Curran, Peter 
Dervan, James 
Donovan, Francis 
Doyle, John 
Eklund, Robert 
Flaherty, Robert 
Foley, Henry 
Foley, Robert 
Frates, Joseph 
Frueh, Frank 
Granlund, Herbert 
Griffin, Robert 
Gronroos, Eino 
Hartstrom, Earle 
Harukiewicy, Charles 
Hathaway, James 
Hawkins, Gerard 
Hawley, Neil 
Heylin, Francis 
Hillman, George 
Hines, Henry 
Johnson, Henry 



Kazulis, William 
Keyes, Winslow 
Koval, Edward 
Kozinski, John 
Lanzoni, Leo 
Lechter, Lester 
Libertourcz, Frank 
Lovelace, Warren 
Lydon, Peter 
Maguire, James 
Malacaria, John 
Manninen, Louis 
McAuliffe, Thomas 
McLean, John 
McMohon, William 
Mike, Richard 
Mills, Albert 
Murphy, Paul 
Murray, William 
Nordbiom, Carl 
O'Brien, Michael 
O'Donnell, John 
Paolucci, Julius 



Pike, Robert 
Porter, James 
Rich, Carl 
Richall, Leonard 
Riley, Paul 
Ritvo, Robert 
Rockwood, Alan 
Roundy, Tyler 
Rowen, Robert 
Sakrison, David 
Schramm, Arthur 
Seostvard, John 
Skolfield, Frederick 
Soloman, George 
Stewart, Robert 
Tierney, Patrick 
Turner, William 
Vasilanskus, Edward 
Very, Robert 
Walsh, Edward 
Walsh, Francis 
Wilford, Eugene 
Worster, Robert 
Wozniak, Edward 



1941 TIOT 



SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY 

On September fifth in the year of our Lord, One thousand, nine hundred and forty 
approximately 244 very confident students passed through the portals of the Nor- 
wood High School with high hopes and very determined, if somewhat strained, 
faces. "Now," sighed each in his rapture, "I am a sophomore in the Norwood High 
School." 

How very disappointed though were these same arrogant sophomores to find 
that very, very little attention was given them. Crafty upper classmen loomed at 
every turn to waylay the uninitiated into any room but the one for which he 
searched. Soon, however, as they took their bearings, the sophomores walked with 
firm and measured tread, ending up in the wrong room only once or twice a day. 

After all was running smoothly the following class officers were elected by 
popular vote: 

President, Ray Martin Treasurer, Jenny Zuke 

Vice President, Eugene Hillman A. A. Council, Howard Pendergast 

Co-Secretaries, Marie Long, Mary Lynch 

At last the great day arrived when the sophomore party was to be held. This was 
truly the first social function of the class. On October 24 the gym was crowded 
with the happy smiling faces of almost the entire sophomore class, under the able 
direction of Ray Martin and his staff of advisers various and hilarious games were 
played. After tremendous quantities of cake and ice cream were consumed the 
orchestra furnished music for dancing until 11:00 o'clock when the party ended. 
Without a doubt the party was a huge success and all who attended had a very 
pleasant evening. 

Looking back at the all too quickly fading year, the sophomore class is very 
deeply indebted to Mr. Thompson, Mr. Hayden, and the entire teaching staff of 
the school for their untiring efforts for our success, and for their very patient help. 

Long live the class of '43! 

Joseph Gullemette, '43. 



SEEN THROUGH DARKNESS 

Oh, snow white clouds, 

Drifting . . . Drifting . . . 

Slowly through the sky . . . 

Can you see 

Through all this darkness, 

This shadow of despair, 

That shimmering shaft of sunlight 

Peace . . . 

The answer to this sick world's prayer? 

Pota Lewis, '43. 



42 



1 941 



T10T 



SOPHOMORE GIRLS 



Aasgaard, Barbara 
Aasgaard, Beverly 
Alty, Kathleen 
Anderson, Clara 
Balboni, Helen 
Barry, Mary 
Bilotta, Anna Mary 
Bilotta, Livia Josephine 
Bissell, Eleanor 
Blazis, Frances 
Borowko, Fannie 
Breen, Nancy 
Burns, Dorothy 
Butters, Mary 
Carpenter, Evelyn 
Carrigan, Mary 
Chubet, Marion 
Clapp, Priscilla 
Cloherty, Mary 
Cohen, Bernice 
Concannon, Gertrude 
Connolly, Mary 
Connors, Mary 
Conti, Louise 
Cormier, Alice 
Costello, Louise 
Curran, Evelyn Barbara 
Curran, Mary Alice 
DeRoma, Josephine 
Devine, Anna 



Devine, Sarah 
Elias, Regina 
Elliott, Jo-Ann 
Engle, Joyce 
Eysie, Mary 
Falconer, Jane 
Ferrara, Rose 
Ferreira, Jean 
Finn, Ruth 
Flaherty, Jane 
Flaherty, Mary 
Foley, Louise 
Foley, Mary 
Fulton, Ruth 
Grebus, Olga 
Groh, Barbara 
Hartshorn, Barbara 
Hoffman, Ellen 
Holman, Dorothy 
Holman, Margaret 
Hunter, Helen 
Jackstis, Helen 
Jankowski, Lillian 
Johnstone, Jean 
Jurgelewicz, Helen 
Keith, Marie 
Kelly, Gloria 
Kendrick, Honorine 
Kiander, Bernadette 
Knaus, Helen 



Kuszynski, Helen 
Leahy, Ruth 
Lee, Dorothy 
Lewis, Eleanore 
Lewis, Marion 
Lewis, Pota 
Logue, Muriel 
Long, Marie 
Lynch, Mary 
MacLemsan, Barbara 
Mahar, Janet 
Mazzola, Eleanor 
Mazzotta, Frances 
McDonough, Marguerite 
McDonough, Mary 
McKelvey, Marion 
Melish, Eleanor 
Meyer, Julia 
Montgomery, Eileen 
Moore, Katharine 
Mulvehill, Monica 
Murray, Mary 
Nieme, Bertha 
Nordbloom, Dorothy 
Nuttall, Patricia 
O'Kane, Lileen 
O'Kane, Kathleen 
O'Malley, Alice 
Palmerine, Jennie 
Paquette, Teresa 



Pledzewicg, Nellei 
Porter, Frances 
Procopio, Theresa 
Ratuse, Jean 
Raymond, Barbara 
Reardon, Virginia 
Reynolds, Marjorie 
Richards, Margaret 
Riley, Rita 
Rooney, Mary 
Sansone, Marie A. 
Sansone, Grace L. 
Septelka, Mary 
Sedhiuskas, Helen 
Simoni, Dorothy 
Singleton, Mary 
Smith, Shirley 
Sodergren, Jean 
Stewart, Shirley 
Stupak, Helen 
Sword, Barbara 
Truskaushis, Isabelle 
Venterosa, Erma 
Watson, Natalie 
White, Margaret E. 
White, Margaret J. 
Wilkes, Helen 
Yelapi, Ann 
Zuke, Jennie 



SOPHOMORE BOYS 



Ahearn, William 
Ambruskevich, Alfred 
Andersen, Arnold 
Barylak, Edward 
Billingham, Albert 
Boulis, Louis 
Butters, Harry 
Byrne, Richard 
Carchedi, Peter 
Carlson, LeRoy 
Carroll, John 
Chandler, Edward 
Chandler, William 
Chisholm, Lester 
Cisternelli, Guy 
Collins, Edward 
Connolly, James 
Conton, Francis 
Conton, John 
Costello, Joseph 
Coyne, Robert 
Crowley, Richard 
Curtin, Theodore 
Dauksevich, Walter 
Dallalis, Stanley 
Deeb, George 
DiCicco, Vito 
DiGiandomenico, Domen 
Donahue, John 
Donlan, John 

44 



Dower, Robert 
Drost, John 
Duane, Charles 
Eklund, William 
Erickson, Arthur 
Flaherty, John 
Flaherty, Joseph 
Flood, Joseph 
Foley, Vincent 
Georgeu, Demetrius 
Georgeu, Spiros 
Gill, Walter 
Gotovich, Francis 
Griffin, Daniel 
Groh, Robert 
Grudinskas, Veto 
Guilderson, Paul 
Guilmette, Joseph 
Hanscom, Elmer 
Hartshorn, James 
Hayes, John 
Herig, Edwin 
Hillman, Henry 
Hynes, Richard 
Johnson, Donald 
Jones, Frederick 
Keady, James 
c Keenan, Richard 
Kennett, Theodore 
King, Martin 



Lewis, Francis 
Lobisser, Robert 
Lorusso, Rucky 
Lozier, Philip 
Lukashewicz, John 
Lukawecki, William 
Machum, James 
Mackie, Clifford 
Mansen, Roger 
Marinelli, Livio 
Martin, Raymond 
Martowska, Anthony 
Mastreanni, George 
Mattson, Russell 
McGilvray, John 
McGuff, Thomas 
McLean, Edward 
McLean, Kenneth 
Mike, Naimie 
Miloszewski, Frank 
Mingels, Francis 
Mogan, Francis 
Mogan, Martin 
Morrow, Raymond 
Murphy, Henry 
Nead, Richard 
Notarangelo, Michael 
O'Brien, Francis 
Ostrom, Bertil 
Palmerini, Orrigo 



Palo, Arne 
Palsic, Ralph 
Pascoe, Harry 
Payne, Harry 
Pendergast, Howard 
Petraitis, Francis 
Praino, Edward 
Readel, Robert 
Richardson, Howard 
Rowell, Richard 
Scott, John 
Seaman, Thomas 
Sheehan, John 
Silvestri, Antonio 
Simoni, Arthur 
Smith, Gerald 
Smith, James 
Smolski, Adam 
Spear, Richard 
Steele, Carl 
Stoyanoft, Stanley 
Vaughn, Jack 
Venterosa, Octavius 
Walker, Joseph 
Walsh, James 
Wernke, John 
Webber, Russell 
Wehmas, Richard 
Zablowski, Joseph 



TIOT 



1 94 1 




■ 






vm; 



1YIII 



FOOTBALL 



Co< 



rA— Mr. Murray 

Co-Captains- 



Assistant Coach — Mr. Sullivan 
-Edward Donovan, Angelo Antonelli 



The 1940 football season showed that the players of Norwood High have what 
it takes. 

Although they did not produce any wonder eleven they did prove that real 
cooperation, and unbounded enthusiasm make a hard-to-beat team. 

In its very first game the team was pitted against Weymouth, a heavy, powerful 
group that later developed into the Class B Champions. 

The only other loss was to the Melrose team which its coach said was then at 
its highest peak of action. 

Needham in the words of Norwood's players was a "Pushover". Milford 
offered opportunity for "just another scrimmage." And Framingham was "stubborn 
enough to give us only 12 points." North Quincy was "another victory" while 
the Taunton win was "hard." 

Only because the two teams were not willing to give in did the score between 
Natick and Norwood remain a to tie. 

With two losses, one tie, and five wins, Norwood looked forward with great 
anticipation to being the victor in the traditional Thanksgiving Day game with 
our Dedham neighbors. Much to the disappointment of players and townspeople, 
for the first time since the two towns have met, the annual classic was called be- 
cause of inclement weather. 

47 



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1 941 




BASEBALL 



Coach — Mr. Murray 



Captain — Russell Richall 



The 1941 baseball season opened with only four veteran players: Russ Richall, 
pitcher; Ed Donovan, first base; Bill Bader, catcher; Ed Bowles, third base. 

The sophomores played an important part in the games. In fact they were 
so good that another Tournament Team is anticipated soon. 

The schedule for the year is included: Milford, Needham, Stoughton, Fram- 
ingham, Franklin, Dedham, Natick, and Walpole. 



49 



1 941 



TIOT 




BOYS' BASKETBALL 



Coach — Mr. Murray 



Captain — Angelo Antonelli 



The Basketball team under Captain Antonelli made a fair showing during the 
season by winning six out of ten games played. Victorious over Walpole and Natick 
twice, the team lost but two games to Framingham. 

The two games with Milford as with the ever worthy rivals the Dedhamites 
were split. 

With this record the team ended the season in third place in the Bay State 
League. 

It is hoped that in the next year or two Norwood will place first in the League. 
New comers to the team will have a job ahead of them to accomplish this, however, 
as much in the way of material will be lost when five of the best players, Angie 
Antonelli, Ed Donovan, Bill Bader, Spuds Murphy, and Russ Richall graduate 
this year. 



50 



TIOT 



1 94 1 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL 



Captain, Bronsie Rasimovich 



Coach, Miss Kiley 



There are really three separate teams, aside from the varsity team, which should 
be spoken about in connection with the girls' basketball: namely the Sophomore, 
the Junior, and the Senior teams. Intramural games were held this year with 
Needham and Natick, and one varsity game was held with Natick. 

Great enthusiasm was aroused over the inter class games. Marie Long's team 
of Sophomores defeated Theresa Salmon's team of Juniors 41-39 in a most exciting 
game, but Bronsie Rasimovich's team of Seniors defeated the hopeful Sophs 30-22. 



51 



1 941 



TIOT 




BOYS' TENNIS 

This year's tennis team, composed mostly of Juniors, has worked enthusiastically 
under the direction of Mr. Fisher. A series of tournaments were held at the be- 
ginning of the season to determine who should make the first team. The result of 
the competition was that Warren Lovelace, Louis Manninon, Allen Rockwood, 
Lester Lechter, and Francis O'Brien became the first five of the tennis club. 

In this team the emphasis is placed upon the improvement which the boys 
make in mastering their strokes and perfecting their playing ability, rather than 
the number of games lost or won. 



52 



TIOT 



1 94 1 




CHEER LEADERS 

Team fight! Team fight! Fight, fight, fight! A rousing cheer such as this, executed 
with snappy, rythmic actions by a set of cheerleaders is enough to snap even a 
despondent crowd into a state of enthusiasm. And this is, actually, the function 
of the cheerleaders; to direct the spirit of the crowds along the right lines. Thus 
the directors of the cheering sections are to a great extent responsible tor the success 
of any game. 

Realizing the privilege and the responsibility which belongs to a cheerleader, 
the students think carefully before selecting their representatives for the school. 
There are six seniors and one junior selected each year by a vote of the entire 
student body, with the junior representative automatically becoming the captain 
in his senior year. This year's team is made up of: Captain, Kay Meissner, Helen 
Zuke, Margaret Davol, Dorothy Pendergast, Louise Gustafson, Shafie Boulis, and 
Robert Pike, Junior member. 

This year's team did a very creditable piece of work, under the capable direc- 
tion of their captain, Kay Meissner. They, as keenly as anyone, felt the disap- 
pointment of not being able to cheer on the last game of the year at Thanksgiving 
because of snow. 

53 



1 941 



TIOT 




NDOOR TRACK 



Coach — Mr. Wheeler 



This year the indoor track team had its only meet with Dedham. Norwood was 
decidedly overpowered and made no creditable score. Donald Cody who was out- 
standing on the team last year, was again the star of the meet. 

This was rather an "off" year for track as few boys came out. However, those 
who were on the team enjoyed the keen competition of their work immensely. 



54 



TIOT 



1 94 1 




GOLF 

Coach — Mr. Learnard 

The golf session opened its 1941 season with only one veteran, Doc Foley reporting. 
With the exception of Robert O'Neil, the only senior, the rest of the team composed 
of Juniors and Sophomores, included Albert Billingham, John Carroll, Robert 
Conley, James Maguire, Robert Very, Edward Chandler, Howard Pendergast, 
and John Doyle. 

Twelve matches are to be played at the Furnace Brook Country Club, Blue 
Hill Country Club, South Shore Country Club, Needham Country Club, YYalpole 
Country Club, and Wallaston Country Club. The schedule includes Quincy, 
Canton, Weymouth, North Quincy, Walpole, and Needham. 

This year the team is in line tor the new trophy being presented by the Norfolk 
County High School Golf League. 



55 



1 941 



TIOT 




QUEST CLUB 

High school students are sometimes unconsciously selfish in their attitudes and 
interests. They become so engrossed in enjoying themselves with their friends 
that they seldom stop to think of the happiness of people outside of their own little 
circle of acquaintances. The Quest Club, an organization composed of almost 
every student in the school and under the capable direction of Miss Gow, affords 
an opportunity for each student to think of and to serve others. 

At Christmas time members of the Quest Club are at their busiest arranging a 
party for the small children of the town who perhaps otherwise would not find the 
Yuletide season so happy. The decorations, games, and gifts having been prepared 
by the Questors, the day of the party comes, and the school is given over to the com- 
plete control of the Quest Club members, under the authority of this year's presi- 
dent, Angelo Antonelli. The party to many high school students represents the 
happiest occasion of the year, and it is indeed a beautiful sight to see the students 
marching proudly into the gymnasium, each holding the hand of some starry eyed 
little tot. 

From the first minute to the last the party runs smoothly, with each child 
enjoying himself to the utmost. It might be observed, however, that the Questors 
seem to be even happier than their small charges whose slightest wish is their com- 
mand. The climax of the party, the arrival of Mr. Santa Claus Lynch, followed 
by the distribution of gifts, brings to a close one of the most memorable experi- 
ences of the year. 

The Quest Club has proved again and again the theory that unselfish giving is 
definitely the only worthwhile kind of giving. It is hoped that this theory and its 
practical application will be carried on beyond the high school by the graduating 
class. 

58 



TIOT 



1 941 




DROP THE HANDKERCHIEF 




COME AND GET IT!! 



59 



1 941 



TIOT 




TRAFFIC SQUAD 

Director, Mr. Hayden 

Taking an idea and enlarging upon it until it became a valuable unit, a worthwhile 
organization, Mr. Lynch, when he was submaster, instituted into the High School, 
the traffic squad. Then Mr. Lynch left and Mr. Hayden took over. 

The traffic squad is a well co-ordinated unit for corridor patrol. Its chief 
function is to enable rapid passage from class to class, with a maximum of efficiency 
and a minimum of confusion. All of this is effected through close cooperation be- 
tween squad members and the "brains" of the business, the aforementioned Mr. 
Hayden. 

Squad members are seniors, chosen by the combined vote of faculty and class- 
mates. It is their job to preserve, through vigilance and tact, order in the halls. 
When, however, momentary lapses in vigilance occur — and they do occur — timely 
pep talks from the director put the seniors back on their toes. Long live the traffic 
squad! 



60 



TIOT 



1 94 1 




ORCHESTRA 

At the beginning of each year there congregates in room 217 a group of varied 
musicians; some of whom have played before in orchestras, others of whom lack 
any experience of this kind whatsoever. Anyone hearing this group play together 
for the first time might well ask, "What can be done with a group like that?" 

The answer to this question lies in the person of Professor Jean V. Dethier, our 
well liked and talented instructor of music, whom we are most fortunate in having 
at our school. Unabashed by the first demonstration of his 1940-1941 orchestra, 
Professor patiently and painstakingly begins his task of blending together into one 
harmonious whole the component parts of the orchestra. Within a comparatively 
short time he has the group organized and working smoothly as one unit, ready to 
delve into more difficult compositions. 

The orchestra is one of the most pleasurable and at the same time one of the 
most essential organizations of the school. At the Senior Play, at assemblies, on 
class day, and at graduation its efforts are vastly enjoyed and appreciated. 

According to Professor this years's orchestra has done an especially fine piece 
of work. However we place the credit where it is due, and thank the Professor 
himself for whatever success it has achieved. 



61 



1 941 



TIOT 




DEBATING CLUB 

The debating club under the direction of Mr. Butler has held debates with Canton, 
Attleboro, North Attleboro and New Bedford at their schools and at home, this 
year. A debate was also held in the Girl's High School in Boston and an exhibition 
debate was held at Sharon for the Sharon Legion Post. 

The members of the teams debating outside schools were Priscilla Wenstrom, 
Captain, Catherine Phalen, Margaret Holman, Priscilla Clapp, Anthony Silvestri, 
Naime Mike and Gerad Hawkins. 

The Debating Club meets each Monday afternoon when debates between club 
members are held. 



62 



TIOT 



1 94 1 




PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB 

The Photography Club was organized three years ago with the purpose of enabling 
enthusiastic camera fans to gain further knowledge about their hobby and of getting 
other students interested in this fascinating work. This year under the direction 
of Mr. Fisher the members have been engaged in developing film, printing, as well 
as enlarging pictures, and experimenting with portrait pictures. To further stimu- 
late interest various contests were held. Officers elected for the year were: John 
Petraitis, President, Patricia McDavitt, Lorraine Dalton, and Francis Triventi. 
To wind up the season the Club planned a trip to Mt. Chichorua. 



63 



1 941 



TIOT 




RED CROSS CLASS 

This year, for the first time, a course in Red Cross work was conducted at the 
High School. This course is not concerned mainly, as might be expected, with 
making bandages or with giving artificial respiration, although these are taught. 
On the other hand, however, it presents the care of the sick, the intricacies of baby 
care, facts on healthful living, and, in general, a well rounded course in this phase 
of domestic art. 

Twelve girls made up each of the two classes, Miss Canning, the school nurse, 
was the teacher. One class was held on Monday, the other on Thursday. The 
above picture presents the Thursday group. This course was, in effect, an experi- 
ment this year, and was restricted to seniors. It was a great success, as will be 
attested by every one who took it. It is hoped that the girls of the oncoming classes 
will appreciate it and snap up the chance to become one of its members. 



64 



1941 TIOT 

SENIOR STATISTICS 

BOYS 

Best Looking Alfred Breen 

Edward Coughlin 

Most Popular Edward Donovan 

Best Dancer Russell Richall 

Most Scholarly William Harrington 

Best Dressed Charles Henry 

Most Athletic Angelo Antonelli 

Wittiest Gerald Mathews 

Best Sport Eddie Donovan 

Cutest Russell Garland 

Most Sophisticated Ray Kinny 

Most Likely to Succeed Charles Henry 

Done Most for Class Don Cody 

Most Gentlemanly Charles Logue 

GIRLS 

Best Looking Margaret Davol 

Most Popular Louise Gustafson 

Best Dancer Aria Koski 

Most Scholarly Marion Bailey 

Best Dressed Helen Zuke 

Most Athletic Jean Hanson 

Wittiest Mary Nuttall 

Best Sport Louise Gustafson 

Cutest Anne Costello 

Most Sophisticated Betty Zephler 

Most Likely to Succeed Marjorie Bodge 

Done Most for Class Mary Nuttall 

Most Ladylike Mary Bernier 



66 



IULIAD 

(Inspired by Latin) 

This is a tale of Trojan men, 

Of heroes strong and bold; 

And of the hate they bore the Greeks, 

In those brave days of old — 

In those brave days of old. 
Aeneas was a sightly lad, 
A joy to every eye; 
Of noble brow, of shoulders broad, 

And of a stature high — 

And of a stature high. 
Aeneas had a little son, 
And lulus was his name; 
And in this tale that follows now, 

He makes his bid for fame — 

He makes his bid for fame. 
One day when lulus was down-town, 
He was so very hot; 
That with a nickel, from a Greek, 

An ice-cream cone he bought — 

An ice-cream cone he bought. 
Now lulus knew as well as I, 
To fear the gift of Greece; 
But he had paid well for this food, 

And so he walked in peace — 

And so he walked in peace. 
And as he happy homeward trod, 
He met his father, and — 
He offered him a bite of that, 

Which he held in his hand — 

Which he held in his hand. 
"Ah food for gods!" his father said. 
"Where did you get that stuff?" 
But when the boy said, "At the Greek's" 

His father said, "Enough!" — 

His father said, "Enough!". 
"My son! My son!" Aeneas said, 
"A lesson must be taught; 
So give to me that ice-cream cone, 

Which from the Greek you bought — 

Which from the Greek you bought" 
"Now lulus, son," the father spoke, 
"This hurts me more than you." 
He laid a hand upon the boy — 

A hand both straight and true — 

A hand both straight and true. 
And when he sent the boy to bed, 
And stood there all alone; 
Aeneas raised his hand, and then — 

He ate that ice-cream cone — 

He ate that ice-cream cone. 
Moral: When along life's course you trod, 
And act upon a whim; 
What e're your father doesn't know 
Will never bother him — 
Will never bother him. 
Editorial note: The moral which this tale, dear friend, 
Tries hard to you impart; 
Must not as you will quickly note, 
Be taken straight to heart — 
Be taken straight to heart. 

Mary Nuttal, '41. 



67 



194 1 TIOT 

GIFTS 
Class Gifts — Girls 

Sophie G. Aidukonis — A "U" card — Just for a change. 

Marion Elizabeth Bailey — miniature piano — Here's one you can carry with you. 

Dorothy C. Balboni — lunch ticket — This one's on us. 

Evelyn Mary Balduf — white nurses cap — Something to look forward to. 

Marion Victoria Bamber — package of beads — Make another bracelet to add to 

your collection. 
Muriel Catherine Barrett — a cup — For your dancing ability. 
Beatrice Felicia Bartulis — pencil sharpener — To keep your shorthand pencil 

ready for use. 
Ruth Ann Berezin — tape measure — What are your measurements now, Ruth? 
Mary G. Bernier — bicycle — This will help you to move faster. 
Florence Marie Bilotta — a merit badge — For being such a "good" scout. 
Marjorie Holbrook Bodge — knitting needles — To help you with that Red Cross 

work. 
Alice Agnes Breen — curling iron — First Aid to that perpetual wave. 
Emily Elizabeth Cappuccino — a horn — To let us know you're coming. 
Barbara Louise Carchedi — hair pins — Long hair is sometimes a bother. 
Dorothy Freda Carpenter — newspaper — You're a "nice" type. 
Mary Elizabeth Center — song — "Remember the Maine." 
Mary Margaret Connolly — string — Keep this string tied to your finger so he 

won't wander. 
Evelyn Mary Conroy — ball — Bounce this to happiness. 
Anne Elizabeth Costello — pin cushion — 'Cause you're never "stuck up". 
Pauline Elizabeth Coury — a round-trip ticket to Detroit — Isn't that nice. 
Eleanor Ruth Davenport — a well — Still waters run deep. 
Margaret Louise Davol — adhesive tape — See if you can stick to one. 
Florence Barbara Devine — Leopard skin — So he's a Tarzan is he? 
Julia Anne Dillon — honey — Sweet as you. 
Margaret Constance Donovan — a magnet — We chose this because it is like you, 

attractive. 
Camella Theresa Fabiani — ticket to Tennessee — And don't come back with a 

drawl. 
Olga Mary Fatch — song — "Smile darn you, smile." 

Mary Louise Feaver — Penny — Here's one "Coyne" you won't have to work for. 
Mary Elizabeth Flaherty — a record — to record that wonderful voice of yours. 
Ann Elizabeth Flood — black hair dye — We prefer it red. 

Kathleen A. Franklin — a message — Go to Mrs. Webster's at the close of school. 
Inez J. Gallazzi — a peach — Just what you are. 
Priscilla Jean Gardner — an "A" in English — Frame it. 
Eleanor P. Giampa — a picture — Your as pretty as one. 

Barbara Elizabeth Gove — Palmolive soap — "For the skin you love to touch." 
Mary Josephine Guillemette — "bobby" pin — Now you'll have two. 
Theresa Marie Gulla — a glove — We hope it fits the way you do with us. 
Ethel Louise Gustafson — cough drops — Is that Cough (lin) still around? 
Jean A. Hansen — Ipana — "For the smile of beauty." 
Margaret Mary Hayes — a yodel — 0-lea-o-"Leahy". 
Mary Margaret Hayes — glasses — To help you see through jokes. 
Dorothy Hermanson — toy soldier — Or would you rather have the real one. 
Barbara G. Hood — a mouse — Call it "Mickey". 

Erina M. Ippoliti — pad and pencil — What a nice secretary you'd make. 
Ethel Arline Jackson — an anchor — This will give you weight with that sailor. 



TIOT 1941 

Barbara Jean Johnson — a pin — 'Cause you're always as neat as one. 
Eva Jeanette Jurgevich — a book — "Ready, Willing and Able." 
Constance Kallgren — an "A" — For that term test you missed in English. 
Mary Stephanie Karkota — a friendship ring — So that you and Marie will never 

be separated. 
Julieanna Kazulis — Wheatics — Is this where you get all your pep? 
Marie Anne King — a throne — All "Kings" sit on thrones. 

Aira Karina Koski — contract — To teach dancing as an Arthur Murray instructor. 
Patricia Anne Lane — compass — So you can find your way home when you go 

out of town. 
Theresa Marie Langlois — an airplane — Does this remind you of someone? 
Annie Lanzoni — ruler — To add a few inches. 
Nancy Witton Leavis — sugar — Sweets to the sweet. 
Helen Joyce Machum — a French book — Vous parlez Francais bien. 
Mary Elizabeth Maguire — a telephone — We'd like to hear more from you. 
Barbara Ann Martin — a heart — Try to hold on to this one. 
Celia Max — glasses — You're so faithful in your studies. 
Marie Ann McDonough — a window — We can see right through you. 
Pauline McKelvey — a key — You're something to a door (adore). 
Anne Loretta McKeown — a fireplace — You're a brick. 
Bernice J. McLatchey — a megaphone — Perhaps you can be heard now. 
Kathleen M. Meissner — a bag of potatoes — Now you'll always have a "Spud" 

around. 
Mary Frances Mickenzie — a pass to the Guild Theater — You deserve one. 
Mary Adele Mickunas — a bottle of Coca Cola — This is one you won't have to sell. 
Helen B. Miloszewski — a fashion book — Although you don't need one. 
Louise Anne Mondor — a wig — To cover up those "Bald-y" spots. 
Mary Elizabeth Mullane — a false face — To cover up that innocent expression. 
Katherine Mary Murphy — marriage license — Just to hurry things along. 
Phyllis A. Norling — Nursery Rhyme — "Georgie Podgie." 
Joan Elizabeth Notarangelo — a watch — Count the number of words you say 

a second with this, Joan. 
Mary Theresa Nuttall — a donkey — You ought to get a "kick" out of this. 
Elizabeth Margaret O'Connor — face powder — To cover up those rosy blushes. 
Nora Helen O'Donnell — a chain — This will keep you near Julia. 
Mary Elizabeth O'Leary — a picture of Gene Autry — So he's your heart throb, 

huh? 
Teresa Agnes O'Malley — a bag — Pack up your troubles. 
Mary Agnes O'Toole — telephone — "Norwood High School." 
Dorothy Elisabeth Pendergast — Alka Seltzer — For those effervescent spirits. 
Edith Priscilla Pfieffer — a four-leaf clover — To bring you luck. 
Elizabeth Claire Praino — a battery — You're a live wire. 
Bronsie Ann Rasimovich — a ball — Put another one in a basket. 
Barbara Ann Raymond — A hair brush — For your shining hair. 
Florence Helen Rhenstrom — a blue ribbon — For that prize-winning essay of 

yours. 
Barbara Marylin Richards — a lamp shade — You're easy on the eyes. 
Dorothy Mary Richardson — a baton — Continue your profession as a leader. 
Margaret Virginia Ross — roller skates — To keep you in practice. 
Helen Elizabeth Sears — a pair of earrings — Variety is the spice of lite. 
Anne Marie Seery — Baking Soda — This is caustic too. 
Blanche Theresa Sienkiewicz — a Chemistry charge account — Now you'll have 

one of your own. 
Frances Ellenora Sironka — A season ticket to the Walpole dances — We hope 

you'll enjoy it. 

69 



1941 TIOT 

Leona Skolfield — gum — A substitute for chewing the rag. 

Barbara Jane Smith — Blondex — In case your hair starts to darken. 

Evelyn Marguerite Sternberg — a bad report card — "How extraordinary". 

Julia Ann Suriano — sunshine — To match your disposition. 

Annie H. Thomas — a bee — You're some "Honey". 

Helen Marie Wall — a smile — This ought to look familiar, Helen. 

Elizabeth Margaret Walsh — a doll — Just as cute as you are. 

Emma Virginia Walter — a top — You're tops! 

Edith Osborn Ward — a battery — To charge out that hidden life in you. 

Frances Pauline Wetta — a record — You've made a good one here. 

Alice S. Whedon — natural nail polish — This is the only shade you haven't tried. 

Louise Katherine Wozniak — tatting thread — Try a new pattern with this. 

Marion Elizabeth Zepfler — a broken heart — You try mending one. 

Helen Zuke — a ladder — To help you reach those high notes. 

Class Gifts — Boys 

Pius Joseph Amirault— a tank — "Fill 'er up, Joe." 

Harold R. Anderson — a picture of Hedy Lamarr — Would you like this one? 

Angelo Danny Antonelli — telephone — That's quite a "line" you have. 

William Bader — a worm — So that you can "bait her" (Bader). 

Austin James Bailey, Jr. — a rubber car — This one Won't rattle. 

Frank Barjod — a car — So you can rush to your crush in your old jalopy. 

Edward David Bowles — a bowling set — 'Cause Eddie Bowles. 

Alfred Breen — an invitation — "Come up and see us some time." 

Robert Richard Brissette — a table — You can always hold your own. 

William Francis Butters — a carrot — You know why. 

Joseph L. Carchedi — electric light bulb — You're so bright. 

Ralph David Cashen — radio — You're always broadcasting. 

John Murray Clapp — date book — Try to keep this one for a change. 

Donald James Cody — an order for a corsage — At last you've got one. 

John Vincent Collins, Jr. — a cushion — To go with that Davenport. 

Raymond Vincent Conton — a bird — This one's a Marten. 

James Michael Costello — clown suit — Why don't you put this on, Jim? 

Edmund Joseph Coughlin — alarm clock — Set this for your day dreams. 

James Joseph Coughlin — P.G. course — Now you can stay with her. 

Fredrick Thomas Deeb — Old Dutch Cleanser — To one who is always in "Dutch". 

Calvin Joseph De Roma — perfume — This has d'aroma, too. 

Daniel Thomas Devine — chamois — Shine your car with this. 

Lawrence Edward Donlan — magazine — Try selling this for a change. 

Edward Leo Donovan — a scale — You have a "weigh" with the women. 

James Joseph Donovan — a degree — To teach at Morse Hill Prep. 

Frank Anthony Dovidauskis — a chisel — Carve yourself a niche in the world, 

Frank. 
Richard Fardy — murine — For that sparkle in your eye. 
George Horton Farnham — sox — In case you get cold feet. 
Arthur Norman Ferguson — a ship — To remind you of former happy (?) days. 
John Joseph Flaherty — collection of girls' pictures — So you won't be lonesome 

at B. C. 
Matthew J. Foley — a grocery order — For Pendergast's? 
Russell James Garland — glue — If you really want your hair to stay down. 
Donald G. Hamlin — gas station — Like father, like son. 

William Joseph Harrington — a cane — Why don't you raise it once in a while? 
Earle Colburn Hartson — a key — So you won't lose your "heart, son". 

70 









TIOT 1941 

Robert John Hennessey — smelling salts — To keep up those spirits. 

Charles Robert Henrt — candy bar — Time for "Oh, Henry". 

Halem Howard — nothing — Just take every Monday off. 

Stanley G. Kaliesauskas — knife — You're a "killer". 

Herbert Algot Kallstrom — muffler — Stop making so much noise. 

Alexander John Kavall — rouge — You've got plenty of cheek. 

Karlton Henry Keeler — movie coyitract — You ought to be in pictures. 

Joseph Robert Kelly — Welch's Grape Juice — Be like Irene Rich. 

Winslow Gilbert Keyes — lease — For one corner ot the office. 

John J. Kiander — a jew inches — That's all you need to be as tall as the rest. 

Ray F. Kinney — a ghost — Boo! 

Joseph Benedict Kudirka — a roll of film — You always need one. 

John C. Leahy — a gag — Stop making all that noise. 

Charles David Logue — a pair of garters — You should have had these for the 

Senior Play. 
James F. Maroney — a red light — Stop! (And shop.) 
Gerald B. Matthews — a joke book — So you'll never run out of gags. 
Francis Edward McAuliffe — afire engine — Now all you need is a license. 
W. George Mike — identification card — Now we can tell you apart from your 

brother. 
James Lawrence Monahan — peanuts — The jumbo brand. 
Leo Francis Mulvehill — soap — Because you're plenty "Sudsy". 
Edward Philip Murphy — a book — "How to Make her Yours." We hear you've 

tried many ways but couldn't succeed. 
Martin Edward Norton — ketchup — "Catch up". 
Robert Emmett O'Neil, Jr. — hammer — Like father, like son. 
Ernest Orlando Paolucci — a uniform — Or aren't you following your brother? 
Francis Thomas Paquette — song — "I'll take you home again Kathleen." 
Robert Francis Paquette — a strap — To help you carry her books home easily. 
Albert Lucien Pelletier — a driving lesson — We've seen you driving through 

town. 
John Bernard Petraitis — a tumble — Give this to the girls. 
George E. Phalen — an "A" — We hear you're "Phalen". 
Walter James Phalen — vitamins — So you'll always be "Phalen" fine. 
Frank Peter Procopio — a razor — Today you are a man! 
Clyde James Rafuse — a new vest — And don't "Rafuse" this. 
Russell William Richall — a vote — Another one for your dancing ability. 
Henry Richards — a medal — For that perfect attendance record. 
Walter Bennett Russell — oil — You old smoothy! 
John Samm — racquet — Because you make plenty of it. 
Alfred Sarapas — collar button — Sleep on these to keep those dimples. 
Rocco Joseph Silvestri — spinach — See what it does to Popeye. 
Adam Paul Sirvinsky — elastic — See if you can stretch. 
Edwin J. Stone — a pencil — With the compliments of Miss McGonagle. 
Francis J. Surrette — dumbells — So you can become a "Sampson". 
George Thomas — a mouse — You're as quiet as one.?! 
Michael Joseph Thornton — mints — Good for that after smoke. 
Patrick. Tierney — an invitation — We'd like to know you better. 
James Jack Tomm — a memo pad — Just an absent-minded "Prof". 
Francis Alfred Triventi — a cartoon — A timid soul. 
Clifford E. Waite — a song — "Wait(e) for the Wagon." 
Vito John Wasilunas — a card — We hear you're one. 
Ahti John Wuori — nerve tonic — It doesn't pay to be bashful. 
Victor Zilaitis — an art eraser — We don't think you'll ever need one. 

71 



1941 TIOT 

CLASS WILL AND TESTAMENT 

We, the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Forty-One, in order better to perpetuate 
a fond remembrance in the hearts of our successors, do hereby bequeath these few 
tokens of our appreciation for the kind respect with which our associates have 
accorded us — particularly during this last year. 

Article I — To the faculty, in grateful appreciation of their unending efforts 
in our behalf, we increase their vacation to twelve weeks with pay; we hope it won't 
be too difficult to collect. 

Article II — To Mr. Thompson we leave three bright green handkerchiefs to 
go with his tweed suit; we feel that it will give that added touch. 

Article III — To Miss Gow we leave two hours of spare time — to be used 
every day in the week and twice on Sunday. 

Article IV — To Mr. Hayden we leave a permanent supply of chocolate- 
covered ice creams to while away the lunch periods — but don't forget, Mr. Hayden, 
that too many will prove disastrous to that school-boy figure. 

Article V — To Benny Murray we leave better weather for next year's foot- 
ball season — to say nothing of a perfect day for the Thanksgiving Game. 

Article VI — To the janitors we leave ninety nigger black boys with silver 
brooms to help remove the debris after our exit. 

Article VII — We leave John Flaherty's spirit to haunt Miss Nicholson. He 
has been so occupied for three years now. 

Article VIII — We leave Margaret Davol's orange sweater to anyone foolish 
enough to wear it next St. Patrick's Day. 

Article IX — Donald Hamlin's enormous stature we leave to Richard Nead — 
not that he needs it. 

Article X — We leave Kay Meissner's spur-of-the-moment ideas to anyone 
who has a friend to squelch her. 

Article XI — To the library we leave five good, juicy novels, three detective 
stories, and a two-year subscription to Popular Comics. 

Article XII — To the Junior Boys we leave the Peabody School for Girls. 
Variety is the spice of life, you know. 

Article XIII — We leave Alfred Sarapas' long eyelashes and dimples to Helen 
Ennis. You probably don't want them anyway, Alfred. 

Article XIV — We leave three and three-quarters inches of Ann Flood's height 
to Pota Lewis. 

Article XV — Spuds Murphy's infectious grin we leave to Ray Martin. You 
boys will need to have your faces lifted if they grow much broader. 

Article XVI — We leave Mary Connolly's Zazu Pitts' manner to Natalie 
Watson. 

Article XVII — We leave the hot water in the bubbler outside 204 to any 
Junior boy with cold feet. 

Article XVIII — Mary Nuttall's ability as production manager of skits and 
entertainments we leave to the members of the incoming Sophomore Class; we're 
sure it will make their social life more enjoyable. 

Article XIX — We leave Matthew Foley's glib tongue to Twinks McLean, 
who seems to be a logical successor. 

Article XX — Beatrice Bartulis's sunny disposition and admiration for Mr. 
Darling we leave to Vera Daunt. We're sure that you can take care of both be- 
quests, Vera. 

72 



T I O T 19 4 1 

Article XXI — To anyone who feels his hair is thinning out we leave the 
flowing locks of Donald Cody and Martin Norton. 

Article XXII — -We leave Angelo Antonelli's shrinking, violet-shy attitude 
to "Doc" Foley. Why don't you bashful boys come out in the open and let people 
know you're around? 

Article XXIII — We leave Russell Richall's proficiency on the dance floor 
to that acknowledged master of the art — Robert Pike. 

Article XXIV — We leave Ray Kinney's dare-devil nature and his reckless 
disregard for law and order to his worthy successor — James Dervan. 

Article XXV — We leave Jimmie Bailey's ancient and honorable Ford to 
Robert Bodge. (That is, if it holds out until then.) 

Article XXVI — To all undergraduates who wear saddle shoes we generously 
donate three bottles of super-de-luxe white shoe polish — guaranteed to make the 
dirtiest shoes white. 

Article XXVII — We also donate the latest model in noiseless refrigerators 
to the lunchroom to keep the milk cold during the warm weather. 

Article XXVIII — Frannie Surette's fatal fascination with the women we leave 
to Jack Adelmann. On one condition — provided he doesn't exert this influence 
between the hours of 9 A.M. and 2 P.M. 

Article XXIX — As a final gesture we joyfully leave all book reports, "A" 
and "B" assignments, and homework — behind. 

In Witness Whereof, we have hereunto subscribed our name and affixed our 
seal to this document this twenty-ninth day of May in the year of our Lord, Nine- 
teen Hundred and Forty-One. 

The Class of Nineteen Hundred and Forty-One 
Witnesses: 

Margaret Donovan 
Joseph Amirault 



73 



1 941 



TIOT 



CLASS PROPHECY 

Time: Any time. 

Place: Anywhere. 

Situation: After seven years imprisonment, Edward Murphy and Mary 
Nuttall escape from the ice cake in which they have been confined. How they got 
there is quite a story. In the interests of experimental science, Charles Henry and 
Richard Fardy had perfected suspended animation by freezing. At the end of the 
allotted time, however, these eminent scientists had forgotten, accidentally or 
otherwise the formula for melting the ice. Thus, for seven, long years these unfor- 
tunate two, Mary and Edward, were out of circulation. Only their minds were free 
to know what was going on. Finally, through superhuman effort, Edward Murphy 
succeeds in breaking through the wall of ice, and frees himself and his co- human 
guinea pig. They fall to reminiscing. 

Spud: If I ever get my hands on Charles Henry! 

Mary: Or Fardy — 

Spud: Say, what happened to those other two scientists? 

Mary: You mean Henry Richards and Francis Triventi ? They invented the 
atom smasher. 

Spud: Oh, yes! Now they use it to smash potatoes. 

Mary: Too bad! too bad! Kay Meissner works with potatoes too, you know. 

Spud: Yeh! 

Mary: Yes, she writes all kinds of potatoe recipes. He latest one is Spuds 
Au-Kay." 

Spud: Pretty good. Did you hear about Jumbo Monahan? Well, he's the 
official keeper of the Tuft's mascot. I hear the students can't tell them apart. 

Mary: Speaking of parts. Remember Barbara Hood? She's a dramatic 
reader of humorous monologues. They are very "punny". 

Spud: Ed. Coughlin is in the public eye, too. He's a music critic. He changes 
the records in nickelodeons. 

Mary: You know who has a career for himself? Its Jimmie Coughlin. He 
is an authority on Latin, Especially Vergil, in North Burlap. 

Spud: These people do get around. Alec Kavall thinned down a bit. He is the 
chief contender for the paper-weight boxing championship of the world. 

Mary: Isn't John Samm in the fight game too? 

Spud: He's a wrestler. "Muscle Man Samm," is what he's called. He has 
Fred Deeb as his manager, Tiger Thomas as his publicity agent, and his two staunch 
friends, George Mike and James Tomm, as seconds. 

Mary: Where's Halem Howard? 

Spud: Halem ? He is an authority on Men's neckwear. His head model Alfred 
Sarapas gets his hair cut at Patrick Tierney's tonsorial emporium where all the 
movie heroes go. 

Mary: Isn't Russell Richall one of the ten best dressed men in America? 

Spud: Yes, he leads an orchestra now, you know. They specialize in barn 
dances. 

Mary: Are Bennett Russell and Eddie Stone still with him? 

Spud: No, Bennett's gone. He poses for Kremel ads. But Eddie is still there. 
He's the top trumpet man in no small way. 

Mary: Oh, do you know that Harold Small is a boat-builder? 

Spud: Yes, and I hear that deep-sea fishermen use his models for under water 
fishing. 

74 



TIOT 1941 

Mary: Did you say Fisher's? Frannie Surrette owns it now. 

Spud: He set an all time high on ten cent ice cream cones. 

Mary: When Helen Sears, the interior decorator, and Frances Wetta- she's 
in Filene's personnel department — stopped in there the other day, it took them an 
hour and a half to eat the helpings he gave them. 

Spud: Robert O'Neil is writing the autobiography ot William Harrington 
who, by the way, wrote, "The Aeneid In Seven and Three-Fights Not So Fasy 
Lessons." 

Mary: He's doing a noble work. 

Spud: Remember Leo Mulvehill? He is the greatest math expert in his field. 

Mary: What field is that ? 

Spud: Outfield. Oh, say, the other day when Willie Bader, catcher with 
Beaverbrook, and Eddie Bowles, coach at Peoria Prep, met for the first time since 
they left high school, they stopped at Vito Wasilunas' restaurant to get a bite to 
eat. Ruth Berizin, superintendent of nurses at the Kansas City Hospital, is now 
watching them with tender care. 

Mary: Olga Fatch owns a little eating place, too. It's called Fatch's Thatch. 
She has engaged Irene Ippoliti as a dietician. 

Spud: Didn't Frank Barjod build his undertaking parlors across the way? 

Mary: Yes, and I understand that business is pretty good. 

Spud: Remember John Collins and John Clapp? They're supersalesmen for 
Calvin de Roma's new automatic umbrella opener. 

Mary: Another mechanical man is Joe Kudirka. He's quite famous now. 
The last I heard of him, he was repairing the telephones in Ruth Davenport's 
mansion on Beacon Hill. She's an heiress, you know. 

Spud: Yeh? Clyde Rafuse, the banker, inherited money, too — $6.26 from an 
uncle in Trinidad. I hear he bought a striped vest with it. 

Mary: Say, what are Danny Devine and Larry Donlan doing now? 

Spud: Oh, they're ping-pong instructors at the Y.M.C.A. Russell Garland, 
the swimming instructor at the Y., almost drowned at the pool when he was hit on 
the head by the woman's high diving champion, Constance Kallgren. Fireman 
Francis McAuliffe had to give him artificial respiration. 

Mary: He saved Ray Kinney, too. Ray was painting a sign over Blanche 
Sienkiewicz's dress shop; he fell, but Frannie who happened to be standing under- 
neath, broke his fall. John Leahy, the busman, saw the whole thing. Blanche and 
her head modes, Anne McKeown, tore up a white evening gown for bandages. 

Spud: I understand they couldn't get any adhesive tape, whereupon, they 
pinned the bandages on. Butch Amirault you probably know, is president of the 
"Never Fail" Safety Pin Manufacturing Concern. Barbara Johnson is his secre- 
tary. He didn't get stuck that time. 

Mary: Ralph Cashen makes pins of a different type. He makes bowling pins. 
Robert Hennessey works in co-operation with him. His bowling ball factory is down 
the street. 

Spud: Sam Foley is their advertising man. He talked up the product so well, 
that Don Cody, the architect, who was going to build a memorial hall and three 
cathedrals, built a string of bowling alleys instead. 

Mary: I understand that Muriel Barrett, the commercial artist, did the 
interior decorating — that's a sideline with her. 

Spud: Everyone says the rooms are a sight for sore eyes. Carleton Keeler, 
who turned out to be an optometrist, sends his patients there to test their eyesight. 

Mary: Is that so? I hear that Barbara Richards is making quite a name for 
herself in the West Coast. She is the onlv woman movie director in the country. 



1 94 1 



TIOT 



She is working on a film which stars Jimmie Costello, the comedian and ex-Fuller 
Brush man. 

Spud: Alfred Breen owns the Fuller Brush Company now, and he's pulling in 
money, hand over fist. You see, he has Marty Norton model the Fuller Brush with 
his whiffle. 

Mary: Remember Jimmie Donovan? What is he doing now? 

Spud: Don't you know? Why, he and Donald Hamlin own the "Sunny-brite, 
Fill-em-rite, Take two and hit to right," string of gas stations. 

Mary: Gordon Small is president of the American Safe Drivers' Association. 
He has awarded Jimmy Bailey a cup for the best record of the year, in his capacity 
as tester for the Ford Motor Company. 

Spud: Charles Logue is now president of Columbia University, where Eddie 
Donovan is instructor of physical education, specializing in horse-back riding and 
deep knee bending exercises. We hear he knows his stuff. 

Mary: Dottie Richardson is a gym teacher, too, at Westwood High. Margie 
Ross is the dancing teacher there. 

Spud: Ahti Wuori is in the real estate business with Ernest Paolucci. They 
recently sold a house to Edith Pfieffer, who is starting a nursery school. 

Mary: Harold Anderson, National Boy Scout Leader, recommends this 
nursery school to all his young charges. 

Spud: All the Boy Scouts get their uniforms at Silvestri's Tailor Shop. Rocco's 
voting this year for William Butters for state senate. Red has a big opponent in 
Joe Kelley. 

Mary: Joe was going to run for Mayor, but he thinks Gerald Mathews is a 
sure bet for re-election. 

Spud: I thought Adam Sirvinsky was up for that job. 

Mary: Oh, no, he's after the chairmanship of the board of education, but Ann 
Flood has that in the bag. 

Spud: Ann Costello has completed her book, "All the Answers, and 25 More." 
It's most informative reading. 

Mary: I want to see the latest picture that Margaret Donovan is in. She 
portrays the life of a barefoot Russian refugee. The title of the picture is — "Defeat 
(feet) Hurts." 

Spud: Another theater personality is Helen Zuke, now singing at the 21 Club. 
Mary Feaver and Priscilla Gardner are co-starred with her as tap dancers. 

Mary: Last week Mary hurt her toe, and went to Theresa Langlois, M.D., 
who diagnosed the case as being acute. Doctor Langlois referred Mary to Doctor 
John Kiander, specialist in a cute case. 

Spud: I hear that Doctor Kiander banks only at Moroney's First National 
Bank. 

Mary: Well, at last Margaret Davol has the mails under her command. She's 
post-mistress for the city of Boston. 

Spud: Frank Procopio is her chief letter-carrier. His district is the Latin 
Quarter. 

Mary: Frank buys his shoes at Joe Cachedi's Shoe Store. Mary Karkota and 
Marie McDonough, shoppers for Jordan's buy their shoes there, too. 

Spud: You know Marion Bamber had a nervous breakdown. She was working 
too hard at her social service bureau. She is convalescing at Evelyn Balduf's Rest 
Haven. Nurse Betty Praino is attending her. 

Mary: You know what I found out about Marion Bailey? She makes bicycle 
tours of the LInited States and gives lectures on "How to Get Around." 

Spud: Oh, yes, and then Dorothy Balboni, the fashion designer, follows them 
up with pamphlets on "What to Get Around In." 

76 



T I O T 19 4 1 

Mary: Jean Hanson is the women's tennis champion, now. Kathleen Franklin 
is her eoaeh and trainer. 

Spud: There is a new dude ranch in town. I'.arle Hartshorn owns it. His 
two best customers are Patricia Lane and Phyllis Norling.'who own a beauty salon 
near Florence Devine's dancing school. 

Mary: Angelo Antonelli is a Moxie salesman for the Eyemitt Beverage and 
Bottle Company. He never runs out of his product. 

Spud: Yes, Theresa Gulla's restaurant uses his Moxie. You know Bob 
Meagher is head waiter there. Bob attracts unite a few customers with his special 
service and attention. 

Mary: Speaking of attention, Winslow Keyes is in the army. I think he's a 
special officer or something, because he's always on K.P. duty. 

Spud: He and Clifford Waite ought to get together sometime. Cliff's an army 
pilot. 

Mary: John Petraitis is a pilot, too. Yes, he's the official test pilot for the 
Wiggin's airport. We'll have to take a spin over there to see him. 

Spud: Two more movie stars are Margaret and Mary Hayes. They play in 
double features. Their director wanted to tell them a part in their next picture, 
but they were visiting Annie Lanzoni, who runs a florist shop in Beverly Hills. 

Mary: Dot Carpenter is the owner of a newspaper. Aira Koski writes the 
fashion column and Mary Connolly has a column, "Advice to the Lovelorn." 
Victor Zilaitis is the foreign correspondent. 

Spud: What is Betty Zepfler doing now? 

Mary: Betty Zepfler? 

Spud: Yes, Betty Zepfler. 

Mary: That's who I thought you meant. Betty and Nancy Leavis are models 
at Lord and Taylor's in New York. They are on all the magazine covers. Walter 
Phalen is in charge of that division. It is rumored that he likes his job. 

Spud: Speaking of liking jobs, George Phalen is an ice cream Manufacturer. 
He appointed himself official taster. 

Mary: Joyce Machum, hostess at Emma Walter's Tasty Tea Shoppe, is the 
official taster of the tea that Celia Max's tea company imports from China. 

Spud: You know, Mary Maguire cut some of her hair. She sold three locks 
to Nora O'Donnell, who is a wig-maker. I hear she was paid so much that she took 
trip to Walpole with her extra cash. 

Mary: By the way, Louise Gustafson and Betty O'Connor are hostesses on the 
trains that run between Norwood and Boston. There are so many of them. 

Spud: Yes, the other day Barbara Gove, who manufactures curlers with 
zippers, missed the morning train. She would have been late for an important 
meeting, if Mary O'Toole, who owns a travel agency, hadn't picked her up in her 
new Packard. 

Mary: Inez Gallazi is Barbara's private secretary and adviser, I believe, and 
Mary O'Leary is the curler tester for the company. 

Spud: Barbara Raymond, who manages the Metropolitan Opera Company's 
elevator service, claims that she never curls her hair with anything else. 

Mary: I didn't think that Barbara needed to curl her hair. Pauline Coury 
is a private consultant now, you know. Her head office is in Detroit. 

Spud: Betty Center lives there, too, or does she live in Toledo? She is a 
photographer, isn't she? 

Mary: She has offices and studios in both cities. The other day she took John 
Flaherty's picture for a newspaper. He runs a combination, "Advice to Ladies of 
All Ages and Fashion Commentary" column. 

77 



1 941 



TIOT 



Spud: Beatrice Bartulis reads his column faithfully. She is a copy-reader for 
the newspaper that publishes it. 

Mary: Is that so? Say, what happened to Marie King? 

Spud: Marie is in the radio and in the movies now. She is known as the "Girl 
With the Irish Eyes." 

Mary: Oh, yes. Julia Dillon, you know, plays first violin in Mary Flaherty's 
all girl orchestra. 

Spud: Mary Guillemette used to play the drums in that, but now she paints 
murals. Quite a change. 

Mary: I hear George Farnham owns a musical publishing house. 

Spud: He publishes his own music. 

Mary: Herbert Kallstrom has a rushing business selling fans to the natives of 
Iceland. Original, what? 

Spud: I think Stanley Kaliesauskas has a prize job, however. He is the 
principal of a nursery and has to make stirring speeches to the kiddies once a day 
and twice on Tuesdays. 

Mary: Eva Jurgevich is his secretary. She keeps him well informed. Yester- 
day she and Julianna Kazulis, who is on the advisory board of the nursery, went to 
the show at Florence Rehnstrom's new theater opposite Raymond Comton's pen 
wiper factory. 

Spud: Yes, they met Arlene Jackson there. Arlene is a special representative 
of Dorothy Hermanson's dancing school. 

Mary: Isn't that where Carmela Fabiani, the medical secretary, took lessons? 

Spud: Yes, but when she demonstrated what she had learned to Frank Dovi- 
dauskis, who took over Paul Whitman's place in the musical world, he generously 
gave her $7.40 to take a bus to Canton. 

Mary: She should have gone in Robert Brissette's taxi. He guarantees prompt 
service — if the car holds out. 

Spud: Didn't he buy his taxi at Robert Paquette's second hand car shop? 
I hear he's doing O'K(ane). 

Mary: Michael Thornton bought a car there, too, but it fell apart as soon as it 
hit the road. What is Mike's business now? 

Spud: He owns a drug store. Mary Mullane, the model, and Louis Mondor, 
who poses for cigarette ads, come in there daily for their lettuce sandwiches. 

Mary: Bronsie Rasimovich, the only firewoman in America goes there, too, 
to get her daily double chocolate frappe. I'll bet it just burns Mary and Louise up, 
when they have to watch their weight. 

Spud: Bronsie saved Bernice McClatchy a few days ago. Bernice is a news- 
paper photographer, she was trying to get some unusual shots of Barbara Carchedi, 
the internationally known dancer, as her boat docked. Bernice fell off the pier, 
and Bronsie threw her a life-saver. 

Mary: Louise Wozniak and Mary Mickunas are co-owners of a bakery. 
Barbara "Martin, Lucy's secretary, is just wild about Mary's cream puffs. 

Spud: Pauline McKelvey's business next door is thriving, I hear. 

Mary: She operates a reducing salon, doesn't she? 

Spud: Yes. Barbara Smith's hat shop has become extremely popular I hear. 

Mary: You know why, don't you? Mary Mickenzie, America's foremost hat 
model, buys her own hats there. 

Spud: Annie Thomas is the traveling saleswoman for that concern. 

Mary: I wonder if she has ever visited Cuba where Emily Cappuccino owns a 
sugar plantation. 

Spud: I don't know. What is Helen Milozewski doing for herself? 

Mary: Helen gives lectures on what the model secretary should be. 

78 



TIOT 1941 

Spud: Oh, yes. Katherine Murphy, business manager for R. H. Whites' 
recommends the course as tops. It's held on the roof of the Little Building, isn't it? 

Marx: I believe so. I hear that Joan Notarangelo is well on her way toward 
owning the fashionable shop where she works. 

Spud: That's right near Evelyn Conroy's potato dispensery, isn't it? 

Mary: I think so. I suppose you know that Mary Bernier went to Bermuda 
last summer. 

Spud: Oh, yes! She's a style observer for "American Designers Incorporated." 

Mary: I understand they are getting plenty of stiff competition from Betty 
Walsh's private concern. 

Spud: Doesn't Helen Wall model for that ? 

Mary: Yes, she does. She attracts quite a few customers, too, I hear. 

Spud: It must be the zip and vim she gets from eating Edith Ward's new 
breakfast cereal, "Hoaxies." 

Mary: Speaking of serials. Evelyn Sternberg is writing her life on the install- 
ment plan, for a well known magazine. 

Spud: She travelled around the world, didn't she, as a representative of Leona 
Skolfield's Shoe Polish Factory? 

Mary: Yes. She met Alice Whedon in Zanzibar, where Alice owns and oper- 
ates a beauty parlor, for manicures only. 

Spud: I'll bet the natives crowd her establishment. Julia Suriano is her 
publicity agent. She does a good job, too. 

Mary: I understand that Theresa O'Malley publishes a magazine for high 
school girls. 

Spud: I know it. Frances Sironka is her editor-in-chief. 

Mary: Marjorie Bodge is the head of the American Red Cross, now. 

Spud: She is? 

Mary: Oh, yes. She keeps in contact with all her head offices, too. 

Spud: Speaking of head officers. Arthur Ferguson is the admiral of a ferry 
across the Charles River. 

Mary: The other day he was ferrying Sophie Aidukonis, a private secretary, 
across, when Florence Bilotta, who studies marine life in a submarine, bumped into 
them. 

Spud: I guess Sophie thought it was the Germans, because she jumped into 
the water. They took her to Saint Elizabeth's Hospital, where Anne Seery treated 
her for shock and immersion. 

Mary: Speaking of nurses, Dot Pendergast is always in demand. She sings 
while on the job. Her patients are always in good humor. 

Spud: One of the most famous patients Dot ever had was Alice Breen, who 
broke her little finger while working. She is a parachute jumper. 

Mary: What is Francis Paquette doing now? 

Spud: He's the Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy of Company B. 

Mary: No kidding? I understand that Albert Pelletier taught him to speak 
French — but fluently. 

Spud: Speaking of speaking! It won't be in French when I tell Charles Henry 
where to get off. 

Mary: Or Fardy! 

Mary Nuttall, 
Edward Murphy. 



79 



1 941 



TIOT 



CLASS PLAY 



THE CLASS OF 1941 OF NORWOOD SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Presents 
"OUR GIRLS" 

By Conrad Seller 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM 
FRIDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 15, 1940 

Presented by special arrangement with the 
Dramatists Play Service, Inc. of New York 



Elmer Lovejoy 
Mildred Lovejoy, his wife 
Jessie Lovejoy, 13 years old 
Francis Lovejoy, 14 years old 
Vivian Lovejoy, nearly 16 
Mrs. Wattles, a neighbor 
Chester Wattles, her son 
Phyllis Wattles, her daughter 
Aunt Jessie, Mildred's aunt . 
Hulda, the Lovehoy's maid 
Expressman 



Edwin Stone 

Marjorie Bodge 

Charles Logue 

George Farnham 

Robert O'Neil 

Barbara Hood 

Francis McAuliffe 

Louise Mondor 

Evelyn Sternberg 

Aira Koski 

John Flaherty 



The entire action of the play takes place in the living-room of the Lovejoy 
home in the small American town of Beaver Falls. 



time: present 

Act I. Scene I: Late one summer afternoon. 
Scene II: The next morning. 

Act II. Scene I: Three days later in the afternoon. 
Scene II: The next morning. 

Act III. Scene I: Evening, a week later. 
Scene II: Early the next morning. 



TIOT 



1 94 1 



PRODUCING STAFF 

Stage . . . . . . . . . . .John Bailey 

Lighting ........... John Clapp 

Bookholder ......... Theresa Langlois 

Properties, Louise Gustafson, Margaret Davol, Barbara Richards, Leona Skolfield, 

Marion Bamber, Shafie Boulis, John Collins 
Make-up ....... Irene Ippoliti, Phyllis Norling 

Publicity, Mary Nuttall, Ralph Cashen, Kay Meissner, Florence Rehnstrom, 

Theresa Langlois, Ann Flood 
Costumes ...... 

Posters ...... 

Music ...... 

Ushers ...... 

Tickets, Miss Louise McCormack, Ruth 

Connolly, Anne Costello, James Donovan, Margaret Donovan, John Flaherty 
Director ........ Miss Eleanor L. Peabody 



Elizabeth O'Connor, Florence Bilotta 

Mrs. Ethel H. Cook 

Prof. John V. Dethier 

Miss Ruth M. Gow 

Berezin, Dorothy Carpenter, Mary 



Miss Elizabeth James 
Mr. Henry Fairbanks 
Jean Hansen 



CANDY COMMITTEE 

Barbara Martin 
Nancy Leavis 
Betty Praino 



Barbara Raymond 
Julia Suriano 
Margaret Hayes 



Head Usher 
Annie Thomas 
Mary Flaherty 
Theresa O'Malley 
Mary O'Leary 
Beatrice Bartulis 



Mary Hayes 
Margaret Ross 
Dorothv Richardson 
Marie McDonough 
Mary Mikenzie 



Betty Center 
Barbara Smith 
Frances Sironka 
Mary Feaver 
Marna Karkota 
Emma Walter 



Ruth Davenport 



.1 Iter ti ate s 



Helen Wall 



The members of the Senior Class wish to acknowledge the kindness of Miss 
M. Elaine Fulton who made the slip covers for the stage furniture, and of Mr. 
Robert O'Neil who constructed the stairway used in the stage set. 



SI 



1 941 



TIOT 






John Fitzgerald 



John Reynolds 



George Fitzgerald 



CUSTODIANS 

The students entered the school. A chill, even greater than the cold outside, 
greeted them. The principal, in his office, sat wrapped in a raccoon coat. The 
submaster vainly strove to warm his frozen fingers. The poor secretary stood 
shivering at the counter. True Story? No, It Can't Happen Here. 

It can't happen here with competent custodians such as we have at Norwood 
High. Warm weather, cold weather, the school is always comfortable, and more- 
over in a condition of meticulous neatness. 

We are so accustomed to taking for granted the privileges and comforts of 
school that we seldom stop to think about those who have made them possible. 
But, let us now extend a vote of thanks and appreciation to the custodians, better 
known as the janitors, of the school whose service and friendly helpfulness so far 
exceed the actual requirements of their work. 



82 



TIOT 1941 



NORWOOD 

(The Norwood High School Song) 

There's a school on the hill called Norwood, 

And her sons and daughters, too, 

Are all the true supporters 

Of her glorious flag ot blue, 

And whene'er her sons are fighting, 

And would rather die than yield, 

You can hear the school that backs them up 

Go singing down the field. 

Chorus 

Norwood, dear Norwood, We sing to you, 

We will be loyal to your flag of blue 

So Norwood, dear Norwood, as years go by, 

Give us a cheer Rah! Rah! 

Give us a cheer Rah! Rah! 

Cheer for Norwood High. 

To the school on the hill called Norwood, 

And her flag of blue above 

We will pledge our dear devotion 

And never dying love, 

Although time may dim her mem'ry, 

And the years their change may bring, 

We will still be true to Norwood High, 

And still we'll proudly sing. 



83 



1941 TIOT 

GRADUATION HONORS 

THE H. M. PLIMPTON ART PRIZE 

THE BERWICK ENGLISH PRIZE 

TEACHERS' CLUB SCHOLARSHIP 

THE MEMORIAL ATHLETIC CUP 

THE EDWARD S. COSTELLO MEMORIAL TROPHY 

THE NORWOOD MOTHERS' CLUB SCHOLARSHIP 

HIGH SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS 

JOHN C. LANE MEDALS 

NORWOOD WOMAN'S CLUB SCHOLARSHIP 



84 



1941 TIOT 

AUTOGRAPHS 



1941 TIOT 

AUTOGRAPHS 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



College of Liberal Arts 

Offers for young men a broad program of college 
subjects serving as a foundation for the under- 
standing of modern culture, social relations, and 
technical achievement. Students may concentrate 
in any of the following fields: Biology, Chemis- 
try, Economics-Sociology, English (including an 
option in Journalism), and Mathematics-Physics. 
Varied opportunities available for vocational 
specialization. Degree: Bachelor of Science or 
Bachelor of Arts. 



College of Engineering 

Offers for young men curricula in Civil, Mechan- 
ical (with Diesel, Air-Conditioning, and Aero- 
nautical options), Electrical, Chemical, Industrial 
Engineering, and Engineering Administration. 
Classroom study is supplemented by experiment 
and research in well-equipped laboratories. 
Degree: Bachelor of Science in the professional 
field of specialization. 



College of Business Administration 

Offers for young men six curricula: Accounting, Banking and Finance, Marketing 
and Advertising, Journalism, Public Administration, and Industrial Administration. 
Each curriculum provides a sound training in the fundamentals of business prac- 
tice and culminates in special courses devoted to the various professional fields. 
Degree: Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 



School of Law- 
Offers three-year day and four-year evening un- 
dergraduate programs leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. A minimum of two years of 
college work, or its full equivalent, required for 
admission to undergraduate programs. Case 
method of instruction. 

The School also offers a two-year evening pro- 
gram open to graduates of approved law schools 
and leading to the degree of Master of Laws. 
Undergraduate and graduate programs admit men 
and women. 



School of Business 

Offers curricula through evening classes in Ac- 
counting, Industrial Management, Distributive 
Management, and Engineering and Business, lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Business Ad- 
ministration in specified fields. Preparation for 
C. P. A. Examinations. A special four-year curric- 
ulum in Law and Business Management leading 
to the Bachelor of Commercial Science degree with 
appropriate specification is also offered. Shorter 
programs may be arranged. Co-educational. 



Evening Courses of the College of Liberal Arts 

Certain courses of the College of Liberal Arts are offered during evening hours 
affording concentration in Economics, English, History and Government or Social 
Science. A special program preparing for admission to the School of Law is also 
available. The program is equivalent in hours to one-half the requirement for the 
A.B. or S.B. degree. Associate in Arts title conferred. Co-educational. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Colleges of Liberal Arts, Engineering and Business Administration offer day programs for men only, 
and are conducted on the co-operative plan. After the freshman year, students may alternate their periods 
of study with periods of work in the employ of business or industrial concerns at ten-week intervals. 
Under this plan they gain valuable experience and earn a large part of their college expenses. 



FOR CATALOG — MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 
Director of Admissions 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Please send me a catalog of the 

□ College of Liberal Arts 

□ College of Engineering 

□ College of Business Administration 

Name 

Address 

C-99 



□ School of Law 

□ Evening School of Business 

□ Day Pre-Legal Program 

□ Evening — College of Liberal Arts 



Tel. NORwood 0236 

The 
Norwood Women's Shop 

631 WASHINGTON STREET 
NORWOOD, MASS. 



DR. N. F. STEWART 

Optometrist 
679A WASHINGTON STREET 



Tel. Norwood 138 
for appointment 



DR. J. M. HIRSCH 

WASHINGTON STREET 
NORWOOD, MASS. 



Telephone Norwood 565-R 

COMPLIMENTS 
— of — 

RILEY & RILEY 

Attorneys 



JACKS 
TAXI SERVICE 

Norwood 0022 
Agent for Greyhound Lines 

CONGRATULATIONS 

TO the 
GRADUATES of 1941 

SELWYN'S MARKET 



Compliments 
— of — 

Primrose Beauty Shoppe 

681 WASHINGTON ST. 
Room 14 Tel. 0676 



Frances M. Brown 



Viola V. Lee 



Meats 



Fish 



HUMPHREYS MARKET 

625 Washington Street 
Norwood 

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

Telephones Nor. 1441-1442 



vvvvvvvvvvvvvv^vvvvvvvvvv^^^^ 



£5rina UJour 

SAVINGS 

to the 

NORWOOD CD-OPERATIVE DMK 



Compliments of 

NORWOOD PHARMACY 

638 Washington Street 
CHARLES C. LANGLOIS E. M. L. LANGLOIS 

Telephone Norwood 1582 

Frank A. Morrill, President Carroll P. Nead, Treasurer 

FRANK A. MORRILL, Inc. 
General Insurance 

BIGELOW BLOCK 698 WASHINGTON STREET 

NORWOOD, MASS. 



Compliments of 

THOMAS F. HOLMAN 
Caterer 



Tel. Norwood 0512 



Norwood, Mass. 



Compliments 
— of — 

JOHN MUTCH & CO 

it 



Compliments of 

BALBONI'S PACKAGE STORE 

856 Washington Street Norwood, Mass. 

Telephone 1876 



Compliments 
of... 



Norwood Dairy 
Lunch 

Wm. Pothier, Prop. 



Compliments of 

The Ernest May 
Funeral Service 

85 Nichols Street, Norwood, Mass. 
Telephone Norwood 1509 



EDUCATION FOR THE DEFENSE 
oi DEMOCRACY 

What are YOU planning to do with the next few years of your Life? 
Start your college education for a life-time profession? Work at a 
trade in a defense job? Many ambitious young people are already 
combining both plans and you can do it too by enrolling at 

SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY 

You can attend the evening division of any department and keep a full-time 
day job. Or you can attend the morning division and work afternoons or 
evenings on a defense job. Make these next few years count for something 
definite in your educational program and at the same time prepare yourself 
better to serve your country in its program of Defense for Democracy. 
Thirty (30) College scholarships available to those who need financial aid 
and can meet our scholastic standard in competitive examination July 1, 
1941. Only 1941 graduates of New England high schools are eligible. 
Applications close June 15th. Send for information. 



SUFFOLK COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS: 

5-yr. day or evening course for A.B. degree. Also special 3-yr. Pre-legal course meeting require- 
ments for entrance to Suffolk Law School. Associate in Arts certificate awarded upon satis- 
factory completion of 60 s.h. Entrance requirement: 15 acceptable units. Cultural and 
pre-professional programs. 

SUFFOLK COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM: 

5-yr. day or evening course for B.S. in J. degree. Practical professional course. 

SUFFOLK COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: 

5-yr. day or evening course for B.S. in B.A. ciegree. Majors in accounting, advertising or 
business management. 

SUFFOLK LAW SCHOOL: 

4-yr. day or evening course for LL.B. degree. Entrance requirement: 60 s.h. of academic work. 

SUFFOLK GRADUATE SCHOOL OF LAW: 

2-yr. evening course for LL.M. degree. For LL.B. graduates only. 

IMPORTANT: High School graduates not eligible to enter Suffolk Late School or Suffolk 
Graduate School of Law without previous academic work. 



OPENING DATE IN ALL DEPARTMENTS — September 22, 1941 

Call, write or phone CAP. 0555 for catalog 

SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY REGISTRAR 

Derne Street Beacon Hill Boston, Mass. 



THE 
MODERN DAIRY 

Thomas A. Donovan 



Grade "A" 
Pasteurized Milk 

in Cream Top Bottles 

HEAVY CREAM - LIGHT CREAM 

BUTTERMILK 

BUTTER -- EGGS - BOSCO 

TOMATO JUICE 

• 

350 Lenox Street, Norwood 
Telephone Norwood 0084-W 

GREEN ACRES 

640 WASHINGTON STREET 

Breakfast, Luncheon and 
Dinners 

All Kinds of Sundaes 

Try Our Delicious Coffee 

Compliments 
— of — 

S. BEREZIN 
Furrier and Tailor 

58 DAY ST., NORWOOD, MASS. 



BAIGH 

PHARMACY 

ANTHONY E. MICKUNAS 
Ph.G., Reg. Pharm. 

it 

PRESCRIPTION 
DRUGGIST 



1140 Washington Street 
Norwood, Mass. 
Phone NOR. 1985 

Office: Park. 3828 - Res.: Hyde Park 2531-J 

T. LEO BRACKEN 

Norwood Representative 

METROPOLITAN LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY, N. Y. 

4258 Washington Street, Roslindale, Mass. 

CURTAINS DRAPERIES 

and SLIP COVERS 

Made to Order 

Norwood Fabric Shop 

6 Guild Street 
Norwood, Massachusetts 



(©^©©^V^^VVVVVVV^VVV^V^ 



Gertrude's Pastry Shoppe 

641a Washington Street 

Norwood MASSACHUSETTS 

Norwood 094 8-M 



Fancy Pastry Is Our Specialty 

Compliments 

— of — 

JOHN E. CORBETT 
D.M.D. 

Compliments 

— of — 

Giordano's Barber Shop 

WASHINGTON STREET 
NORWOOD, MASS. 

JAMES PETRAITIS 

CUSTOM TAILOR 

Cleaning • Repairing 



1148 Washington Street 
Norwood Massachusetts 



V/V/V, 



DR. RONALD BRUCE 

Norwood Veterinary 
Hospital 



# 



Nor. 148(i 



Need. 0019 



BURTT'S PHARMACY 

170 WALPOLE STREET 
NORWOOD, MASS. 



Telephone Norwood 1853 

Compliments 
-of — 

PICKS J. G. A. STORE 

166 WALPOLE STREET 
The Best at the Lowest Prices 

GARNER'S PHARMACY 

Prescription Specialists 

Kodak Headquarters 
Camera Supplies 

639 WASHINGTON STREET 

Telephone 0038 



Telephone Norwood 0554 

Kleps Auto Electric 
Service 

Batteries, Ignition, Carburetion 
Locksmithing 

12 GUILD STREET ■ NORWOOD, MASS. 

Compliments 
. . of . . 

EDWARD V. WARABOW 

Funeral Director and Embalmer 

1156 Washington Street 

Norwood, Mass. 

Telephone Norwood 1503 



COMPLIMENTS 
— of — 

DR. A. J. KIZELEWICZ 

Phone 1666-W 

NORWOOD MENS SHOP 

Clothing and Furnishings 

683 WASHINGTON STREET 
NORWOOD, MASS. 




C. & W. FOOD MART 

Heavy Western Steer Beef 
Fish, Fruits, Groceries and Vegetables 

301 NAHATAN STREET, NORWOOD, MASS. 

Tel. Nor. 1620-1621 Free Delivery 

James Curran and James Wall, Props. 



HAYES AND WALL 

Complete Auto Service Texaco Products 

Norwood 1942 



Jke 

LIMPTON PRES: 



ik 



COMPOSITION 
PRESSWORK 



ELECTROTYPING 
BINDING 





COMPLIMENTS 


COMPLIMENTS 




-of — 


— of — 


CAFE 
TRIANON 


The 

Norwood Malt 

Company 


• 


• 


S$$^5S«S$!S$$B§SS$$^S$$$^^^^$$< 


*^$$3>$$$$$$$$$$$$«^s^s<^$«^»§ 



Compliments 
of the 



<JLaw J^ocLetu of if lovwood 



Hon. Frank B. Coughlin 
Paul A. Sykes Frederick Sherwood 

Dennis P. O'Leary Benjamin G. Sykes 

Francis C. Foley Walter Gotovich 

Joseph E. Riley Charles L. Donahue 

James J. Curran Joseph S. Crowley 



COMPLIMENTS 


Compliments of 


— of — 


HOME SERVICE BUREAU 


DR. A. C. PERONA 


Abby J. Spear 
director 


• 


525 WASHINGTON STREET 




NORWOOD, MASS. 


Compliments 
of . . 


Norwood Radio Company 


R.A. Norton, N.H.S.,' 19 


T. FARIOLI 


Radio Sales and Service 


68 WALNUT AVE. 


Electric Refrigerators 


Norwood 1650 


711 WASHINGTON STREET 
Norwood 1101 



L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 

ATTLEBORO, MASSACHUSETTS 

• 

Foremost in the Manufacture of 

CLASS RINGS AND PINS ■ COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 

DIPLOMAS • PERSONAL CARDS 

CUPS • MEDALS ■ TROPHIES 

• 
Jeiveler to the Senior Class of Norwood High School 



REPRESENTATIVE . ^ DAI PA] ID f* f\ 

EUGENE MANCHESTER L. G. BALFOUK LU. 

93 High Street, North Attleboro ATTLEBORO MASS. 



QUICK 

EFFICIENT 

ECONOMICAL 

SERVICE 

JMurwnnit Gas 
Company 



THE FAY SCHOOL 

A Secretarial School for Young Women 
52 Beacon Street ■ Boston, Mass. 




Two-Year Course 
Academic subjects 
o£ college grade 
and executive sec- 
retarial training: 
Electives: Medical 
Shorthand and 
Court Reporting. 

One-Year Course 
Jpl Executive secre- 
3 larial training. 

Summer Course 
Shorthand and 

Typewriting 

Extra-curricular 

activities 

Cultural and social 

^ ideals developed 

For catalogue 

address: 

Irene Fay, Director 



J. J. PRAINO 

Plumbing and Heating 

411 PROSPECT STREET 
Tel. Norwood 1059 



Bendix Washing Machines 


Demonstration Evenings 


COMPLIMENTS 


LEWIS RESTAURANT 


— of — 


The Home 


TOWN SQUARE 


of 


A.A. 


GOOD FOOD 


9 

Bed Wilkes 


• 
Bed Wilkes 


for 


for 


THE CLASS OF 1941 


THE CLASS OF 1941 


from 


from 


THE CLASS OF 1942 


THE CLASS OF 1943 


• 


• 



,vvvvvvvvvvvvv*^vvvvvvv>vvvv^^^ 



ALL BRANCHES OF BEAUTY CULTURE 

Jen's Beauty Shoppe 

Specializing in 
Permanent Waving 

719 Washington Street 
Tel. NOR. 1594 Norwood, Mass. 

Watch Repairing Budget Plan 

National Jewelers 

Jewelry Diamonds Watches 

692 WASHINGTON STREET 
NORWOOD, MASS. 

BEST WISHES 

for a 

HAPPY and SUCCESSFUL 
FUTURE 

to the 

N. H. S. CLASS of 1941 

it 

FLAHERTY'S 
MENS SHOP 



NORWOOD 



MASS. 



Compliments 
-of — 

NORWOOD TAXI 

— INC. — 

Phone 400 



Fordham Beauty Shop 

We are experts on all 
branches of 

Beauty Culture 

10 VERNON ST. Tel. Nor. 0292 



ik 



i5§||* MEN'S 

^Mjf%" and 

' KT ^LADIES' 







CLOTHES 
to RENT 
READ & WHITE 

111 SUMMER ST., BOSTON 



* 



WILLIAM F. LOVELL 
D.M.D. 



m. j. Mcdonough 

World Travel Service 

ALL SERVICES FREE 

AIR — STEAMSHIP — BUS 

Hotels — Travelers' Checks 

Room 1 Folan Block 
Norwood 1463 

Compliments of 

COOPER'S 
5c to $5.00 STORE 

1040 WASHINGTON STREET 
SOUTH NORWOOD 

"Put your feet in Regan's hands" 

SOLE AGENTS FOR 

RED CROSS 

AIR STEP 

ENNA JETTICK SHOE 

For Women 

Regan's Shoe Corner 



COMPLIMENTS 
— of — 

BARRY THE FLORIST 



WALTER S. CARTER 
Gulf Products 

Washington St. and Douglass Ave. 
Norwood, Mass. 
Phone Nor. 1399 

COMPLIMENTS 
— of — 

Dr. KENNETH McELWEE 
D.M.D. 

A+ in Beauty if you 
go to 

Milady Beauty Shoppe 

681 Washington Street 

Norwood 

Telephone 1139-J 



,VVVVVVVVVV',VVVVVVVVVVVVVVV>VV^^^ 



GAY FARM 

MILK and CREAM 



Fresh, rich quality milk from our 

own herds of state and 

federal tested cows 



Produced under sanitary 

conditions 

with 

up-to-date equipment 



95 PROSPECT STREET 
Tel. Nor. 1168 

Visit Our 



ULTRA MODERN 
SERVICE STATION 

Stuntzner 
Socony Service 

9 VERNON STREET 

it 

NORWOOD BUICK 
COMPANY 

10-16 COTTAGE ST. NORWOOD 
"BEST BUICK YET" 



THE 
DAILY MESSENGER 



BRINGS YOU 

TODAYS NEWS 

OF NORWOOD 

EACH DAY 

PLUS 

A. P. WIRE, FEATURES 

AND 

NEWS PHOTOS 



Two cents a copy and worth it! 

Compliments 
... o£ ... 

<UJre56 Ljoodd 



THE GILLIS BUSINESS SCHOOL 

Established 1926 

FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

COMPTOMETER EDIPHONE STENOTYPE 

BOOKKEEPING BUSINESS ENGLISH SHORTHAND 

ACCOUNTING TYPEWRITING SPEEDWRITING 

MIMEOGRAPH 

Individual Instruction 
Day and Evening Classes 

30 Walpole Street, Norwood Norwood 0844 



COMPLIMENTS 
— of — 

WIIVSLDW BRDS. and SMITH CD. 

Sheepskin Tanners Since 1876 

NORWOOD MASSACHUSETTS 



►vvv^vv^vvvvvvvvvvvvv^^^^ 



BURDETT 
COLLEGE 




Wk 



ere THE TRAINING MEETS THE 



NEEDS OF THE TIME 

for the immediate ae 



id 



One- and two-year courses. Well- 
qualified faculty. Extra-curricula 
activities. Day and Evening classes. 
Previous commercial training not re- 
quired. Courses meet the needs of 
business and government. Calls 
for graduates exceed the supply. 
Catalogue contains full information. 



BUSINESS TRAINING SINCE 1879 



BURDETT COLLEGE 



for the futi 



oppc 



*tuniti 





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Under -Grads know us 
for what we are 

And we know our Under-Grads and what they 
like in the way of smart, new campus-styled clothes. 
That's why Under-Grads have come to know 
Kennedy's Under-Grad shop as the New England 
headquarters for the most up-to-date clothes for 
high school men 

KENNEDY'S 

UNDER-GRAD SHOP 




.►vvv^^v^vvvw^vvv^vv^ 



Compliments 
-of — 

CLIFFS BAND BOX 

Cleaners 

At Your Service 
Telephone: Norwood 1668 Residence: Waltham 147-M 



DREYFUS & WHITE 

Wholesale - Retail 



Fruits and Vegetables 

629 and 715 WASHINGTON STREET 

Phones NORwood 1526 - 0592 - 0482 

E. E. DROUIN 

The Store of Quick, Reliable Service on 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing of All Kinds 

Stone Setting • Engraving ■ Gold and Silver Plating 
Society Badges and Jewels to Order 

710 WASHINGTON STREET NORWOOD, MASS. 

JENNY SUPER SERVICE STATION 

Tires Recapped * Vulcanizing 
General Repairs * Motor Tune Up * Ignition 



495 WASHINGTON STREET 
Benjamin A. Dulkis, Proprietor 



Telephone 0685 



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the cJLona f\un . . . 




you and your friends will prize the portrait that looks 




like you — your truest sell, free from stage effeets and 




little conceits. 




It is in this "long run" photography that l'URDY 




success has been won. 




Portraiture by the camera that one cannot laugh at 




or cry over in later years. 




For present pleasure and future pride protect your 




photographic self by having PURDY make the portraits. r 




■sj^- Pleasing Portraits 




^f Prompt Service 




•fa Right Prices 




Means Satisfaction Guaranteed 




PURDY 


160 


TREMDNT STREET ROSTOV 




LJfncial j-^hotoar cipher / forwooa ^J^riak School 




Class of 1941 




Special Discount Rates to All Norwood High School Students 



Congratulations to the members of the Senior Class of 

NORWOOD HIGH SCHOOL 

Their spirit and accomplishments have been an 
inspiration to the community 



BIRD & SON, inc. 

Established 1795 

East- Walpole, Mass. 



NEW YORK • NORWOOD, MASS. ■ SHREVEPORT, LA. • CHICAGO 

Compliments 
— of — 

NORWOOD DAIRY 



Talbot Block — Room 16 
Corner Washington and Guild Streets 


Best Wishes Class of 1941 


Telephone Norwood 0062 


MARTIN J. FOLEY, 09 


Onyx Beauty Salon 


Insurance 


All Branches 


% 


of 




Beauty Culture 


525 Washington Street 


CLOSED WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 


Norwood 



COMPLIMENTS 

— of — 

SOUTHERN 
THEATRE 



COMPLIMENTS 

— of — 

WELCH'S 
NEWSTAND 



COMELIMENTS 

of the 

VIKINGS 
ORCHESTRA 

fle&utq. Culture 

A VOCATION 
OF DIGNITY 

Offers young men and women a life of 
Refinement, Security and Prosperity . . 

Write Today 

Our entire building is devoted to Day 
and Evening Classes conducted by Re- 
nowned Style Creators. Complete 
systematized courses. Most modern 
equipment. 

Moderate Tuition 

Convenient Terms 

Wilfred Graduates are in daily demand 

FREE PLACEMENT BUREAU 

For further information or for free booklet 

write or visit our Academy without obligation. 

Wilfred Academy 

of Hair and Beauty Culture 

492 Bovlston St. boston KEXmore 0880 



UVVVV'^VVVV'-'VVVVVVVVVV*^^^^ 



VERNE I NN 

Luncheons 

Steak Chicken 

Dinners 

We Cater to Weddings, 

Anniversaries, Banquets, etc. 

in our Green Room 

A New Texture 

Complete Catering Service 

inclusive of 
Foods, Table and Service 

Equipment 

For Banquets and Parties in Lodge, 
Home and Halls 

Commissary at Verne Inn 



Compliments 
— of — 

RDLL-LMD 

Roller Skating 

Ring 

Open every night 7:30-11 



For 



Quality Laundry 
Dry Cleaning 

and 

Fur Storage Service 
THERE IS A DIFFERENCE 

CALL 

NORWOOD 
LAUNDRY 

COMPANY 

Telephone 0999 

MACKS TAXI 

"A Call From You 

Means Service 

By Us" 

52 DAY STREET 
Tel. Nor. 0007 

MACKIE'S EXPRESS 

100% Service 

3 Trips Daily • Noon Service 
52 DAY STREET 
Telephone 0175-M 



COMPLIMENTS 
— of- 

Norwood Lumber Co- 

and 

Beaver Coal & Oil Co. 

NORWOOD, MASS. 

A. L. BATEMAIV CD., Inc. 

A good place to have your 

INSURANCE PROTECTION 

902 Nichols Street Norwood 0642 



Compliments of 

TOWN SQUARE HARDWARE 
AND SUPPLY CORP. 



599 WASHINGTON STREET 



NORWOOD, MASS. 



Compliments 
— of — 

REARDON & CARDUCCI 

The Best in Electrical Merchandise 

De ROMA BROTHERS, Inc. 
Electric Shop 

666 WASHINGTON STREET 

Telephone Norwood 1313-W 

GEORGE H. FARNHAM 
.. Music .. 

Lessons and Instruments 
PRIVATE AND CLASS INSTRUCTION 



V 



ICTORIA 

REST HAVEN 

A NURSING HOME 

of 
DISTINCTION 



for invalids, elderly people 
and chronic cases 

Call 



LAURA A. MacKENNEY 

137 Nichols Street 
Norwood 0858 



For 

HAPPY COMFORTABLE 

HOMES 

We Sell and Recommend 

NEW ENGLAND 
COKE 

— Call — 

JOHN A. 
WHITTEMORE'S SONS 

- Inc. - 

296 LENOX STREET 
710 WASHINGTON STREET 

Norwood 0764 

Harold L. Alden, President 



Compliments 
-of— 

THE 
HOLLISTON MILLS 

Inc. 

Norwood, Mass. 

Manufacturers of 

BOOKBINDING FABRICS 



ENDEAN FARM 

MILK and CREAM 

Raw or Pasteurized 

From the 

Farm's Own Tuberculin 

and 

Blood Tested Herd 



Telephone 
NORWOOD 1181 





VVV^VVVV^VV'^VVVV^^^^ 



3088 EMPLOYERS 
WANTED GIBBS SECRETARIES 



• Last year there weren't enough Gibbs-trained 
secretaries to meet this demand! Smart is the 
young woman who chooses Katharine Gibbs prep- 
aration for a responsible position. 

College subjects and secretarial training are 
combined in the Two Year Course for high school 
graduates. Also, intensive One Year Course avail- 
able. Placement service without charge. Delight- 
ful residences in Boston and New York. 

• For your copy of "Emphasis on Success," 
address Entrance Committee, 90 Marlborough 
St., Boston, or telephone COM monwealth 2475. 



*S SCHOOL 



NORTH WALPOLE GREENHOUSE 
Potted Plants and Flowers 

The Newest and Best in Corsage Creations 
Flowers Telegraphed Anywhere Telephone Walpole 159 



Compliments 
— of — 

WILLIAM J. GILLOOLY 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the (jraauatina L^laii 

of 1941 



DRENT BROTHERS 



L/raduafion vJututteri in II (orwood J^lnce 1912 



^vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv^^^^ 



COMPLIMENTS 
-of- 

FURLONG'S 
Candies and Ice Cream 

COMPLIMENTS 
— of — 

LEWIS J. DANOVITCH 
D.M.D. 

PRESS CAFE 

Morris Prager 
Proprietor 



Luncheons 



Liquors 



Compliments 
— of — 

TALBOT ALLEYS 

EDSEN ECKHARDT 



Free Delivery Tel. Nor. 0253 

SWANSON the Florist 



Corsages - Cut Flowers 
Plants 



707 Washington Street Norwood 

E. H. GRANT 

Authorized BIRDSEYE Dealer 

Frosted Foods 

501 WASHINGTON STREET 

FREE DELIVERY 

Telephone 0377 Norwood, Mass. 

Compliments of 

CUMMINGS CO. 

686 Washington Street 
Norwood 

Dresses • Coats ■ Lingerie 

— for — 

Style • Quality • Value 

COMPLIMENTS 
— of — 

DR. THOMAS O'TOOLE 



NEPONSET VALLEY FARM 



PRODUCERS and 
DISTRIBUTORS 



(cjuailtu edjalm f^mductd 



Telephone Norwood 0785 
ICE CREAM STAND — Norwood 0532 



NDRWDDD FURNITURE CD 
Complete House Furnishers 

D. E. Callahan, Proprietor 



720 WASHINGTON STREET 
Telephone 1132 Norwood, Mass. 



Compliments 
— of — 

DENNIS J. COLLINS 
M.D. 



JOHN E. BAMBER 

Architect and 
Builder 

Norwood, Massachusetts 

Everything for Your Car, Radio 
and Home 

SAM'S 

Refrigerators - Radios - Washers 

643-45 Washington Street 
Nor. 1586-0828 



Compliments 






of . 










ELLIS 


POND 






ICE 


CO. 








Nor. 


0250 



Town Square 
Filling Stations, Inc. 

MICHAEL J. KEOHANE 

Gasoline, Oils and Lubricants 

Cottage Street and Broadway 
Norwood 1298 

C. D. MAZZOLA C. W. MAZZOLA 

Mark every Grave 

MONUMENTS of CHARACTER 

— Compliments of — 

Norwood Monumental 
Works 

Wholesale and Retail 
WASHINGTON AND CHAPEL STREETS 
Tel. Norwood 1735 Norwood, Mass. 

Compliments 
— of- 

D. J. MURPHY 
D.M.D. 



Compliments 
— of — 

BROOKS PHARMACY 

Edward Gordon, Reg. Pharm., Prop. 

850 WASHINGTON STREET 

NORWOOD, MASS. 



BOWL FOR HEALTH AND RECREATION 



NORWOOD 
SPORT CENTER 



Cottage Street, Norwood, Mass 



16 New Modernistic Alleys 

Soda Fountain and 

Luncheon Bar 



OPEN ALL SUMMER 

Scientifically Cooled for Ujovtr Comfort 



NEW ENGLAND'S MOST BEAUTIFUL ALLEYS 



Warm Air Heating - Radiator Repairing - Auto Body and Fender Work 
Gas and Electric Welding 

NORWOOD SHEET METAL WORKS 

8 VERNON STREET, NORWOOD, MASS. 
O. J. Germano, Prop. 

Telephone Norwood 0720 



NORWOO D 

FREE PRESS 

• 

'Every home every Friday" 

• 

698 WASHINGTON ST. 

NORWOOD 1000-0060 



Compliments 
of . .. 



SOUTH END 
HARDWARE 

Nick Abdallah, Prop. 



BACK BAY ELECTROTYPE 
& ENGRAVING COMPANY 



172 COLUMBUS AVENUE 
BOSTON, MASS. 



AMBROSE PRESS 

Founded 1895 
NORWOOD AND BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Affiliated with AMITY PRESS - Photo-Offset Printers 

Norwood and Boston 



. 



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